Ethanol15 and my babied 1997 Ford Escort

ford
escort

#1

I’ve babied my 84000 mile Escort to keep me company for many additional miles. Retired, a DIYer, I drive 5000 miles per year, locally only, in CNY snow country. How can I safeguard my investment when I’m informed E15 is taboo for pre-2001 cars?


#2

No, you can’t - and it’s illegal to sell it to you according to the US/DOE. So, I wouldn’t worry too much about it just now. There is a push by ethanol manufacturers to force the sale of intermediate blends (between E10 and E85), but the auto manufacturers say that it will damage all but the E85-capable vehicles. The ethanol manufacturers and their lap dog congressmen and senators are all in favor of it, ut don’t expect the rest of America to let it fly.


#3

I thought they rescinded that E15 stuff not too long ago


#4

Where can you buy E15?

No place I know of.

There is talk of E15 being available in the future, but only for cars designed to use it.

Relax, your '97 Escort will survive just fine on the currently-available E10.


#5

E15 is the fuel NASCAR uses at all three levels of racing it supports. There always will be people who manage to put diesel in their car that does not use diesel (unintentional filling with E15 is one of the “OH No” aspsects to E15). It is generaly agreed E15 is not for use in pre 2001 vehicles. Many manufactures promote their vehicles being E15 safe.There is no plan to reduce the corn fo ethanol plan here in the US. In closing there are more political hurdles for E15 to get over than technical ones.

How to safeguard your vehicle from E15? do not use it, the pumps will be clearly labled. I always knew that Steven Stills guy was a loaner, but still, living in “Crosby,Nash and Young” country should make for some awesome summer night concerts, I did not know they were so partial to snow.

You consider owning an Escort an “investment”? to each his own.


#6

Under pressure from a consortium of 54 ethanol produces, the EPA has now approved the use of E15 as a motor fuel for all cars years 2001 and newer. There are countless articles on this on the internet.

Whether it’ll become commonplace in the marketplace is another question. It is not mandated, and if consumers are not receptive to it the stations won’t carry it and the ethamol producers will be stuck with their overproduction and have to go back to growing feed corn.