Do I need to repair my bumper to maintain safety?

subaru
outback

#1

Hi - I am wondering if I need to repair my bumper to maintain the safety of my 2010 Subaru. I don’t really care about the cosmetic damage, but we bought the car specifically for its safety rating. Is it compromised now because I had a collision and smooshed the bumper?


#2

Possibly. It’s Impossible To Tell Without Seeing It And Even Then . . .

Take it to a reputable Body / Collision Shop or two and get some opinions. See if a Subaru dealer has its own collision repair shop.

Certain parts of the car are designed to absorb an impact - once. Your’s did. It all depends on how much impact.

May I ask why you are considering not repairing / maintaining a 2010 car ?

CSA


#3

Can you describe exactly how much damage there is? Can you post a photo?


#4

I’ll try to get a photo posted. But it doesn’t look terribly bad. The bumper is pulled away from the car on either side about half an inch. The repair estimate was $1800, but the guy said that the reason was that there was a little damage to a lot of different parts. If it wasn’t scraped up, you might not notice it. Just that on the both edges, it is no longer flush, as I said about half an inch.


#5

If the car handles well and the insurance will not cover the damage you may be ok. Have a four wheel alignment. The safety is in your hands more than the bumper. The bumper is designed to protect against body damage up to 10 mph max. After that speed the unibody starts to crumple to protect the center. At 40 mph the damaged bumper is of no real help and a new one is similarly useless. Likely your collapse mounts are toast and the bumper frame bent. As to the rest of the safety the above still applies. Try a junkyard for the bumper posts and a new bumper. Your skin from the old one may be salvaged, that might save about 450 if it has really stuck together.


#6

Just what I was wondering. Thanks!!


#7

Oh, just the $$. The estimate was $1,800 and that just seemed crazy to me. I guess I need a second. I wondered tho if it is like a bike helmet in that way, meant to absorb the impact once. If so, I would definitely get it fixed.


#8

euryale1, I Know That You Run A Fabrication Shop. I Ran An Auto Body Collision Shop For A Couple Of Years In My Past History.

First let me say that your advice ( “If the car handles well and the insurance will not cover the damage you may be ok.” ) could be sound, but how can we know ? That’s why you said “could.” I indicated that a professional would have to physically look at it.

I’m quite surprised that Subaru2010 obtained an estimate from a repair shop or an insurance company (Their “adjusters” often miss all kinds of damage, sometimes hundreds or thousands of dollars worth) and didn’t post that with the original query and then comes here for advice where nobody can see the car. I think Subaru2010 is just dredging for some favorable (right or wrong) answers.

Also, Subaru2010’s bike helmet analogy is a good one. As I said in my earlier post, there are parts in the front-end, designed for safety, that only work for one impact. All the parts are designed to work together, but have to be in original condition to work correctly. We do not know the status of these components.

I usually agree with what you have to say, but having a wheel alignment done instead of repairing any collision damage that would result in needing a wheel alignment is poor advice. If an alignment is called for then it is a body alignment necessary because of front-end “sway”, not a suspension alignment.

CSA


#9

Subaru2010, Who Did The (Withheld Information) $1800 Estimate That You Spoke Of In An Added Comment ?

What other helpful information has been omitted ?

In an earlier post I said, "I’m quite surprised that Subaru2010 obtained an estimate from a repair shop or an insurance company (Their “adjusters” often miss all kinds of damage, sometimes hundreds or thousands of dollars worth) and didn’t post that with the original query and then comes here for advice where nobody can see the car. I think Subaru2010 is just dredging for some favorable (right or wrong) answers. "

Insurance company estimate ? Insurance adjusters often have little to no experience with car repair. I have met adjusters who recently were clerks at convenience stores. Estimates from some sources don’t always reflect actual car damage and that’s why they are called estimates. I have taken many insurance company estimates and then called the insurance company for hundreds of dollars in “additionals.” Also, the company is trying to save money.

Repair shop estimate ? If this $1800 dollar estimate is from a repair shop, what did they say about the integrity (safety of the vehicle ?

Also, May I ask again why you are considering not repairing / maintaining a 2010 car ?

Were you driving somebody else’s car or is it your’s ?

Let me guess that you were at fault in the collision. A 2010 car should be on the road for many more miles and many more years. The car’s value has been diminished and safety is still a question. My advice to you is to make a claim and have it fixed or pay cash and have it fixed. A car with unrepaired damage or neglected maintenance often turns into a rolling POS.

Please provide the rest of any information so that you can obtain meaningful advice.

There’s no way that I’m going to tell you that this Subaru is as safe to drive as it was before the collision and I wouldn’t accept that advice from others, particularly somebody who hasn’t seen it. Your assessment of the damage and the estimate’s assessment may not tell the whole picture. Been there, done that.

CSA


#10

I doubt it is a safety issue. But you bought the car for a high safety rating. Since the bumper has been crunched already it won’t absorb as much energy next time, but I don’t think the difference is a “life or death” difference.

This is practically a new car, so the damage really deminishes the value of the car substantially. Like $3,000 to 5,000 less value. If you can live with the looks and less value then don’t do the repair. If it were me I’d get it fixed.


#11

No probably not.

However definitely leaves a less than stellar first impression on folks.

It also leaves a question mark if you get into another accident. If the damage appears old and new further damage happens it can be more difficult to sort out.


#12

This Was Posted Under Repair And Maintenance. Since The Owner Is Trying To Avoid Doing This And There Isn’t An Avoid Repair And Maintenance Choice, Maybe It Should Have Been Posted Under General Discussion Or Distracted Driving.

I can’t get over the idea that somebody does a couple thousand dollars worth of damage to a car that’s not 2 model - years old and wants to call it good.

There’s something wrong with this picture. We’re being mislead or missing important information, here.

SchreeechH . . . CraaaasshhH . . . . I’M OK !!

CSA


#13

What you really need to do is have the bumper cover removed, and see if the impact absorbing material that actually is the bumper is still intact, or if it has been damaged.

If you don’t have this done, then the next person who has an accident in your Subaru might possibly be more injured than they should have been, thanks to your cost saving desire.

BC.


#14

There Ya Go. Plus, We Still Don’t Know Who Looked This Thing Over. Was It An Insurance Adjuster / Recently Former 7-11 Store Cashier Or An Experienced Professional Body Man / Automotive Engineer ?

Even then, nobody from any business that I know of would ever open themselves to liability by telling somebody with a collision damaged car that it’s just as safe as it was before the crash.

CSA


#15

It usually take 10 years or so for a car to head down the road to ‘heapdom’. Yours is sure getting an early start!