Converting a Toyota Land Cruiser to an Alt Fuel Engine

toyota
gasoline

#1

I have a '72 Toyota LC in great condition that I am thinking of converting to another fuel type at some point. Any thoughts?


#2

Why do you want to do it? You won’t save any money. If it’s just for fun, then have at it. About all you could do with the current engine is to turn it into an E85 truck, and that doesn’t sound appealing. E85 and diesel are generally available, but you’d have trouble finding ethanol, natural gas, propane, or hydrogen.


#3

Exactly WHAT “alternative fuel”?? Why?


#4

Since I am taking the time to restore the vehicle, I am also thinking that I will want to extend the life of the vehicle by replacing/rebuilding the engine. There is still a lot of debate about which alt fuels are the best for the environment, will be available, the most stable etc., so I am exploring the options. The Dept. of Energy website lists alt fuel engine conversion businesses, and some types of conversions are easier than others (complete reconfiguration versus less complex). Ultimately, the energy cost of producing something completely new is higher than converting something that is available for restoration - I think the math is pretty straight forward there. So I’m fishing for ideas.


#5

The inline 6 “F” engine in your Land Cruiser will out last the rest of the vehicle and probably yourself as well. It’s incredibly reliable and durable. Chances are whatever you replace it with won’t be as long lived and robust as what’s currently under the hood.


#6

“Ultimately, the energy cost of producing something completely new is higher than converting something that is available for restoration - I think the math is pretty straight forward there.”

I don’t think calculations support your idea. You say the truck is in great condition, and I suppose that the engine is running well. A turn key conversion can easily cost more than $15,000. See the link below. They quote a labor cost of $8500, implying that the parts cost $6500 or more. But that’s for their parts. You would likely have to come up with some of your own parts, and that will increase the cost. If you include your own labor, the cost will probably be $20,000+. And yes, the math seems pretty straightforward.

here’s the link (oops): http://www.dieseltoyz.com/


#7

It’s actually very easy and can be accomplished in two simple steps.

#1. Sell your Toyota
#2. Buy an alternative fuel vehicle.

Done!

Twotone


#8

Fair enough - it is a great engine - agreed.


#9

Okay, okay, before you run off thinking I’m the wacky tree hugger from the fringe, which I clearly am by the way, I said the energy consumption cost, not the absolute current dollar cost. Given the current prices for conversion, I agree with you - hence the point of asking people with more expertise than I. If the conversion market and a number of other fuel cost and distribution related factors change, both my vehicle and others would be candidates for conversion. A lot of people drop Chevy crate motors in these things for far less than $15K - even I know that. But thanks for the advice.


#10

BTW, link did not come through - can you direct me to your reference?


#11

I posted it above as an addition.