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Car stops accelerating while driving

I have a 95 chrysler lebaron that stops accelerating while driving. I have had the fuel pump replaced twice in the last year and now it is acting up again! It jumps and then gives up. I have not noticed any other signs that happen. help!

We need a description more specific than, “stops accelerating”, or, “gives up”.

Does the problem occur only while accelerating, or does it also happen when driving at a steady speed?

At what speeds does this happen?

When this happens, does the engine stall, or does it keep running?

If the engine keeps running, how fast are you able to drive when this problem occurs?

When this happens, is the engine idling, or does it continue to “rev” fast?

Is the Check Engine Light lit up?

I’m giving this a bump, in the hope that the OP returns to answer the necessary questions…

7 years later, different owner, sounds like the same problem. I got my 95 Lebaron in January this year (2020), and have been enjoying driving it. But a few weeks ago I had to stop for something, and left my son in the car with it running (for A/C). When I came out, I had to remove the key (terminate the engine) to open the trunk. Upon getting into the drivers seat I could start it, but it would cut out unless I kept the gas pressed. If I shifted it into Drive or Reverse it would immediately cut out. While i had it running, with the gas pedal, It had a check gauges light, and when it cut off it would display the Check Engine. I had it towed to a shop where it’s been for the last 3 weeks and they are identifying shorts in the electrical system that they cannot find. They have already changed the distributor.

Probably would have been best to start a new thread. You problem, to me, seems to be different.

Do you know what makes them think that there is an electrical short? What is the error code (P0xxx)? Have they looked at the IAC or throttle body? A good cleaning of the throttle body and IAC (or replacing the IAC) is something would look at in addition to fuel starvation.

I have been told multiple times that the tech working on it will call me, and not getting any updates unless I call them after the last expected call. No details on how they identified the suspected electrical short. Since my car was produced earlier in 1995, it still has the old ODB connection. They don’t have a scanner to read it, as I was told in one update. If they don’t call me back today, I will ask them about the IAC and Throttle body, and what if any codes they got, tomorrow morning.

That is complete B.S. If there is a way for you to find a different mechanic, now is the time to do it.

New OBD readers are backwards compatible. There is no way they are unable to read the computer, even if true they could simply buy a $15 reader on Ebay or Amazon.

Again no call from them, so I called. They reaffirmed the car is so old they don’t have a reader for it so no trouble codes. I asked if they had checked the IAC and Throttle Body and was told they will look at them. It’s just a long process trying to manually track down the issue. I did find an adapter on Amazon that I will be getting to make the ODB 1 connection readable on ODBII scanners.

Any further maintenance that I’m not comfortable doing will be going to another shop ~25 miles away after it gets on the road that is.