California law would require cars to warn drivers if speeding

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202320240SB961

9 you’re fine, 10 you chime

Cali wants their dime

George is fine, he rides olde tyme

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The bill, as proposed, would require vehicles to give a visual and audio signal if the vehicle is traveling 10 mph over the speed limit, not “if speeding”. My wife’s Volvo and our Mercedes Sprinter already give a visual signal as soon as the vehicle exceeds the speed limit by 1 mph. The audio signal would be terribly annoying however.

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Lol… they’re simply mandating the “safety sentinel” that Oldsmobile offered as an option in 1959. I thought it was a good idea then and i haven’t changed my mind.

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New insurance company, do you want this monitor to save money? No many times I am 15 over just to keep up with the flow of traffic.

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Interesting. As I understand w/today’s hi-tech cars, the computer-camera figures out the road’s speed limit by reading the passing signs. How did the 59 Olds figure out the road’s speed limit?

As for whether this is a good idea or not, hard to say. It depends on the specific implementation.

For crying out loud George there was not a sign reading technology in vehicles in 1959 .

Whaaaatttt??? No more 130 MPH driving for R-G in the future???

There was a small knob at the base of the speedometer. This knob was connected to a yellow needle on the speedometer face. It was up to the driver to set the needle to the mph that they didnt wish to exceed. When the speed exceeded that setting a buzzer went off. Not exactly high tech, but it was 1959.

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Japanese cars had a ‘chime’ years ago. Some drivers bragged about how long they could keep the car ‘on the chime’:

Speed chime[edit]

Nissan Skyline R32 series early model, the speed chime is on the back of the instrument panel (metal part near the center)

For a couple of decades, JDM specification model of vehicles often included a speed chime (ja:速度警告音) which rings when a driver exceeds 105 km/h (65 mph) for standard cars and 85 km/h (53 mph) for kei cars. This speed chime was first mandated on November 21, 1974, according to Article 1 of the “Ministerial Ordinance for Partial Revision of Safety Standards for Road Transport Vehicles”. Under pressure from the United States and other foreign producers, this requirement was removed in 1986 with “Ministerial Ordinance for Partial Revision of Safety Standards for Road Transport Vehicles” (Ministry of Transport Ordinance No. 3 of 1986) as being a non-tariff barrier. An additional problem was that the repetitive sound could induce sleep in drowsy drivers. Some models used electromechanical glockenspiel-type systems, while other models used a buzzer. Due to that, nickname for speed chime is kinkon (キンコン), an onomatopoeia for a clanging sound.

Several manufacturers continued to offer speed chimes as an option until the early 2000s. The last vehicle to come with the speed chime as standard factory fitment was the Honda City GA1/GA2.[14]"

Worthless, nobody is going to change the setting each time the speed limit changes from 35 to 45, 50, 55 etc. People set that to 75 mph and forgot about it.

Today’s systems can read speed limit signs and warn the drive if they exceed the speed limit.

My Google maps warns me that I am speeding, might be a chime somewhere hadn’t looked…

I had that 30 years ago with my riv. I’d set it and then get so tired of it going off I’d set it for 90. More silliness.

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This needs to end one way or another.

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People travel 15 mph over the speed limit past my house on a neighborhood street, drive through the stop sign at 20 mph. No consideration for public safety.

There is another thread about limiting the speed of new cars, most objected to this: let us drive as fast as we can.

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I can’t speak for other drivers but I am always perfectly aware of when I am speeding and when I am not. I don’t need the car to confirm it for me.

I am also perfectly aware of when I am using a turn signal to change lanes and when I am not. But I think automatic turn signals would be more important than automatic speed alerts.

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No matter how good a driver I try to be, I frequently find myself going 70mph on taconic parkway when the speed limit calls for 50-55mph.

And the worst case about this issue is that I’m usually the slowest driver on that road.

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My vehicle also gives a visual warning when you exceed the speed limit by 1 mph (the speed limit sign displayed on the instrument panel changes from white to red), but a deep dive into “vehicle customization” showed me that I can change it to a 3 mph or 5 mph warning, so I now have it set to 5 mph. You might want to see if yours is also changeable.

My car has speed assist that allows the driver to alert himself if the posted limit is exceeded. I can also set a speed at which it will enunciate. I don’t use it though.

Would not automatic turn signals require the driver to have a Neuralink implant?

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