Brake Rotor on a 2007 Hyundai Elantra


#1

I was recently trying to remove and replace rotors on my '07 Elantra and came to a roadblock with the bottom bolt connecting the bracket that holds the brake caliper. The bolt seems to be recessed inside a small cavity and I can barely get a wrench on it, much less a socket. It also feels solidly locked up either with rust or just that tight. Has anyone encountered this devilish little bolt before? And how did you overcome it?


#2

Are you sure it’s not an internal wrenching bolt- one that might take an Allen wrench type of tool? Or a torx or star driver? There should be two short bolts that hold the pads and two larger bolts that hold the calipers on, at least everything I’ve worked on had that configuration.


#3

Those caliper bracket bolts are typically installed with high-stress thread lock. Every one I’ve ever dealt with are torqued on pretty tight. Even if it is in a recess, a standard socket should fit. A box end wrench will be darn near impossible if it is in a recess.


#4

Just so we are all on the same page!!!

It is the “Brake caliper bracket bolt” approx 15-18mm

or the “Brake caliper bolt” approx 12mm

http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/beck-arnley-remanufactured-semi-loaded-caliper-077-1953s/10182087-P?navigationPath=L114921%7CL216461%7CL3*15684

The gray bolts facing on the bottom are the caliper bolts, the holes showing on the upper portion would be the caliper bracket bolts.

Yosemite


#5

Can you see the other end of the bolt at all? Sometimes one side of a bolt is locked in a recess, but the other end is where the unbolting action takes place.


#6

If the bolt head is recessed in a rubber or plastic sleeve, loosen the cap on the master cylinder , then use a c-clamp to push the pads back and bottom the piston.
The bolt heads should now be sticking out of the sleeve.


#7

That’s where I was working towards @oldtimer; I also think those are the bolts he’s refering to.

Maybe he’ll reply and clarify it for is.

Yosemite


#8

yeah, what they said…


#9

The bolt I’m looking at is not on the caliper itself. I removed the pads and the caliper holding the pads. The bracket which the caliper was mounted on remains. There are 2 bolts that hold it. They are the brake caliper braket bolts I think 15mm. What I forgot to say earlier is that it is recessed and there is another part of the frame blocking that recess relatively closely, so that any socket won’t fit it and it’s very difficult to get enough torque on any wrench that does because you’re so deep inside the wheel well with no way to leverage yourself. Tried a hammer on the wrench once I knew it was on but I don’t want to strip it obviously. Thoughts? I’m no mechanic but I do regularly replace parts on a car that I know I can reach relatively easily.


#10

Sorry I’m having trouble describing this. Imagine a square hole with a bolt just inside maybe half an inch. Now place a flat obstacle outside that hole maybe an inch away. A socket won’t fit because there simply isn’t room to get it in there, much less the socket wrench on the back.


#11

As I mentioned, these are torqued down really tight and probably even has a thread-lock on it. I’ve had to resort to hitting a wrench with a hammer if I can’t fit my breaker bar or cheater bar in there. Keep one hand on the wrench head to keep it on the bolt head if you can as you strike the other end. It should break loose.


#12

Turn the wheels to full-lock for maximum access and post a picture of what you’re seeing.


#13

A picture would help. I wonder if youre looking at the wrong area. Surely they wouldnt design that to be inaccessible, although engineers never cease to amaze me with a lack of care for maintenance ease.

If you can get a tool on there, hit that sucker with a BFH. Just make sure youre going lefty loosey. It can seem backwards sometimes in a wheel well


#14

Have you tried turning the steering wheel?