Audi transmission problem

audi
a4

#1

On a 2005 Audi A4, 1.8 T… the Audi dealership found a ‘fault for transmission control module’ (the transmission slips), and a fault for vacuum leak (‘crank case venting components dry rotted’). How much should it cost to repair each of these? My partner would prefer to get rid of the car if repairs add up to $4,000 or more, as the dealer would like to charge. The car has 44,000 miles on the odometer. Thanks!


#2

Take it to a good independent shop, not a chain like AMCO, and let them diagnose it and give you a price. 44k is not that many miles to get rid of a car unless it has major issues.


#3

No Audi experience, but the crank case venting problem should be fairly inexpensive to fix. That is probably just the PCV hose or the other hose that is failing. This is a common problem, more so in older cars than yours though. I’d be surprised if replacing a hose would cost more than $100. If the PCV valve needs replacement, $200 maybe. t’s important to get this fixed though, as ignoring it can cause much more expensive engine problems. The transmission slipping, you need a pro to decide if it is a simple repair or you need a rebuild. It would be very unusual to need a rebuild on a car with 44K. You may just need a proper service, drop the pan, replace the filter, and refill to spec. That would cost maybe $250-$350.


#4

Dealer scanner says TCM has fault and u think a pan drop will fix things?


#5

If the transmission has been slipping and the fluid is discolored then the transmission may be on the way out. Any vacuum leak problem goes to the end of the to do list.

The mileage is a bit low for a transmission failure but there are a lot of unknowns. Buy the car new or used, fluid ever changed, aggressive driving possibly in conjunction with that “turbo feel”, etc, etc.

At 4 grand it sounds like the transmission has already been diagnosed as dying and the estimate could certainly be in line with the fault.


#6

Yes, I think it is possible proper service will fix this problem. A TCM fault could well be due to lack of proper service. Automatic transmission seldom fail at this low mileage, unless they have been abused. I’m assuming the OP doesn’t abuse the car, otherwise why post here? So I think it’s well worth it to have a proper service done, and while at it, a good look-see that all the assorted transmission associated parts are in place, electrical connectors, selenoids not sticking,vacuum devices not leaking vacuum, before deciding the transmission needs to be rebuilt. I’d certainly do that if it were my car.