Am i crazy? i'm thinking of buying a '78 AMC concord


#1

does anyone know much about these cars? are parts easy to find? the body is in really great shape with only 27K miles. i do not currently have a car. this would not be a commuter car, it would be used on the evenings and weekends. thanks in advance for your feedback!


#2

If it’s not a car you’re going to rely on as major transportation, then it could be fun to have when people look at you ask,“What kind of car is that?” But this wasn’t the safest car ever put on the road. Parts might be a little hard to find. And as far as getting someone to fix it when it does need repair, find an auto tech with grey hair.

Tester


#3

the problem with a car of this age/mileage is it has obviously been sitting around ALOT.

once you start using it it will promptly start showing its age.

unless you are prepared to treat this as a throw away car, be prepared to spend some money on ordinary repairs.

parts??? not alot, and few and $$$$$$$$$$$$$


#4

This is a car from a simpler time, car-wise. There is much less there to go wrong; so, there is much less that can go wrong.
Just find a mechanic who understands the word “carburetor”.


#5

thanks for your feedback. i too was thinking that it must have been sitting around but it has current tags and the seller’s daughter was driving it recently to commute to school.


#6

Yeah, we are probably both crazy. I want an AMC Eagle from the 80’s.
they were basicly a Concord but 4-wheel drive. I had a friend whio bought a '69 Rambler about 10 years ago with very low miles but when she started driving it, everything started falling apart. And parts are hard to find for an AMC.


#7

In a word: Yes. :slight_smile:


#8

Not what I’d want for an only car - these were from the dark ages of pollution controls, with low power and poor mileage. There’s not much to recommend it besides its oddity. But if you don’t need something dependable, and consider the money spent as a hobby, have fun!


#9

At least I’m not alone. :slight_smile:


#10

As long as it’s a 6 cylinder, go for it! The AMC 258 cu in six is the same 4.0L engine used in many Jeep vehicles today, so parts will NEVER be a problem. Now if you had said a Pacer, that’s one to avoid, but a Concord is a plain vanilla car, a simple and basic design.

If it’s a rare V-8 powered car, pass on it as AMC V8 engines were somewhat problematic.


#11

The 258 is similar but not the same as 4.0L. The 4.0L is a fuel injected smaller version of the 4.2 AMC/Jeep engine. My parents never had any issues with their AMC Eagle(yes AWD) driven over 225k miles until they simply tired of it except for too heavy doors ruining the hinges and ball joint failure very often.


#12

Yup! My brother had an AMC Eagle with four wheel drive. This thing had to be noisiest thing to ride in! But could it go thru the drifts on a windy Duluth winter storm!

Tester


#13

10 years ago I took 2 Eagles and made one, but a friend wanted to buy it , so we sold it before I could test it in snow. Been sorry ever since.


#14

I think I know the model. There was this hatchback type that had a straight six and got gas mileage in the upper 20’s range. It was no good in snow. If it has the old Ford type suspension with springs on the upper control arms, your worn out ball-joints are cheap and easy to replace with bolts. I just don’t remember which was which.


#15

Mechanical parts can be easily had in the aftermarket and body parts could be harder to come by if you wreck it. I’d say jump on it if the price is right.

Some neighbors across the street had one of these things many years ago(the wife’s car, a wagon)and it was a pretty good vehicle. They lived by me for about 3 years, drove it on a daily basis, and made a comment or two that the car needed nothing other than general mainenance type items (brakes, spark plugs, filters, etc.)
When I moved they were still using it on a daily basis.

Might be a bit perverted, but I kind of like the Concord wagon of all things. There’s a super straight one sitting by a guy’s house on a county road about 10 miles from me that appears to be inoperative and one of these days I just might stop and see if it could be picked up for a song or two…
(Like I need something else to dink around with) :slight_smile:


#16

If you like it go ahead…but these vehicles were NEVER a GREAT vehicle. Hopefully you don’t live in snow country because they also rusted out very quickly.


#17

My fathter-in-law’s neighbor had one that was 3 years old. He said the car was unreliable, parts hard to get, and expensive to fix compared to other US cars. That was then, many years ago. I would steer clear of this dog. By the way, it was also rust-prone in the Great lakes area.


#18

A 30-year old car with only 27K miles? If the mileage is accurate and not just rolled over, and you like the car, do it. If you don’t you’ll regret it later and I suspect that even if you have to sell it someday, you’ll at least get back what you paid for it. Check the classic car websites for some idea of what it’s worth before you plunk down your cash.


#19

How much?


#20

The only big questions regarding this deal is how much for the car and how certain is it the mileage is correct?

To me, rust is not an issue that is proprietary to any one particular make of car.
Any aged car in the Rust Belt is going to suffer from rust weevils.
A number of those rust buckets wind up here in OK and from Audi to Zundapp they’re all eaten up.