All wheel drive

saturn
audi
quattro
aura
#1

Very confused as to which is the safest system



Aura RL

Audi 2009 new generation Quattro

Mercedes new 4 matic

#2

I hate to tell you this…but the vehicle only accounts for about 10% of the safety of you and your passengers…90% is based on YOUR driving ability. MOST people don’t need a AWD or 4wd vehicle. What part of the country do you live in that you THINK you need an AWD system?

#3

There is no such thing as a “safest” AWD system, and AWD is not necessarily “safer” than 2WD.

Buy the vehicle you like best. They all have good AWD systems.

#4

I thank you for the rapid response-- but I should have been more specific-- I also wanted to know the techical differences Audi is up to the fifth generation and MB is new generation also

#5

The safest system of the three is the one you equip with 4 quality winter tires.

Tires being equal all 3 systems have one benefit over the other in one condition vs the other. They all are superior to a 2wd system in any adverse condition and all are top tier awd systems.

I have seen test of a few year old AWD’s on YouTube up ski slopes. Typically the cars/SUVs that get up the highest if not top are Subaru AWD and Audi AWD. Audi uses true full time AWD as does Subaru. The rest use electronics, sensors and brake pads to try and get the wheels to spin where the car “thinks” there is traction but ends up fighting itself.

You may want to check out if any newer comparison have been done. I will still take my elegantly simple Subaru AWD(manual transmission) with 50/50 torque split and limited slip rear differential with no electronics over a program that cannot take into account the infinite variables of traction.

#6

For technical differences I suggest you consult the manufacturers web sites.

#7

The safest system of the three is the one you equip with 4 quality winter tires.

Where did he ever say it was for winter driving???

#8

Just remember that AWD and 4WD can help you get out of the ditch if you slide into it, but none of them will help to keep you out. They all can also help get you to the ditch.

As noted, you did not indicate what conditions you may be driving in that may benefit from AWD. If you are going off road then there are one set of needs, like large ground clearance, but you would not need that to get up the mountain to go skiing.

#9

Just remember that AWD and 4WD can help you get out of the ditch if you slide into it, but none of them will help to keep you out. They all can also help get you to the ditch.

Where do you guys get this MIS-INFORMATION…4wd and AWD will keep you out of ditch FAR FAR FAR better then ANY fwd or rwd vehicle you can buy. That’s what they are designed to do. Just this past weekend I spent 4-5 hours traveling in blizard conditions in 4wd…and it was very very helpful keeping me on the road.

#10

For many years we owned TWO Ford explorers, a 92 purchased new and a 91 purchased used in 96. My wife drives the 91, I drive the 92, and comparing two identical trucks, I can steadfastly attest to the safety difference lying directly on the driver. And in the case of these two trucks, a major driveability difference was in the type of TIRES on them.

#11

“and it was very very helpful keeping me on the road.”

And how do you know this? I have driven in five blizzards in Ohio all across the state. I have done it all in 2WD cars. I can’t say that it was 2WD that got me though, but I always got through.

What is your authority that AWD or 4WD will help you stay on the road and keep you from sliding off into a ditch? If you don’t have a reference, how about your theory?

#12

Csn I ask the differences between the 3 systems Acura, audi, and MB 4 matic

#13

And how do you know this?

35+ years of driving in conditions you’ve NEVER DREAMED OF. I lost count the number of blizzards I’ve driven in…50…100 easily. I didn’t always own a 4wd vehicle. I’ve owned many a 2wd vehicle (rwd and fwd). Growing up and learning how to drive in Pulaski was very challenging (average snow fall 300"…compared to Boston of 40"). During many of these snow treks in 2wd there were times I just had to pull over and wait the storm out. NEVER EVER had to do that in 4wd.

If you don’t have a reference, how about your theory

The theory behind it is you have a LOT MORE TRACTION. The more traction you have the more control in adverse weather you’ll have. Do you think there’s a difference between driving on bald tires as opposed to snow tires?? The snow tires give you more traction…4wd and awd gives you MORE TRACTION.

#14

Sorry, Joseph, but I am going to side with Mike on this one. Anything that gives you better traction has the potential to give you more of a chance of staying on course, rather than going into a ditch.

Of course, as we all know (and as you have already stated), the behavior and the skill of the driver is also a HUGE factor. So, AWD/4wd will not help if the driver is a jerk who drives too fast for the road conditions and/or has no clue about how to drive when the car starts to go into a skid.

But, if the driver is–like me and like Mike–someone who drives in a sane, rational manner, the added traction and control of a system that drives 4 wheels instead of only 2 wheels has to give that driver a decided advantage. And, if that driver also uses winter tires, he/she has an incredible traction advantage from the combination of the drive system and the tires.

Nothing will help a dangerous or unskilled driver, but the careful driver who has an AWD system will be more likely to stay out of a ditch, as compared to the careful driver without that system.

I think that my personal driving record (37 years/over 400,000 miles without an accident of any kind) gives testimony to my driving ability. And, of that total, the last 11 years/190,000 miles has been done in AWD vehicles.

Before getting those AWD vehicles, I had a few close calls in various RWD and FWD vehicles when I got bogged down, or skidded, or temporarily lost control of the vehicle, although I was able to avoid accidents in each instance. Since buying only AWD vehicles, I haven’t even had any close calls, since I have never lost traction or encountered any loss of control while driving them–even in severe winter conditions. While this is clearly not a scientific study, I think that my experiences with AWD–as compared to FWD/RWD–are significant.

#15

But, if the driver is–like me and like Mike–someone who drives in a sane, rational manner, the added traction and control of a system that drives 4 wheels instead of only 2 wheels has to give that driver a decided advantage. And, if that driver also uses winter tires, he/she has an incredible traction advantage from the combination of the drive system and the tires.

EXACTLY what I’m saying. Take a good SUV with good tires and a driver with experience and who doesn’t drive NUTS are almost impossible to beat. My son’s friend drives his Dad’s Grand Cherokee. Good vehicle for the snow…EXCELLENT snow tires…son’s friend has ditched it twice this year so far…His Dad has NEVER put the vehicle in a ditch.

#16

There is no significant difference between these systems, as far as every day driving is concerned, regarding safety. They are all very highly developed, at the top of the industry, along with Subaru. Drive them and pick the one you like.

#17

You can, but if nobody who knows the answer reads it, you will get mostly answers like the ones already here. Will a Barracuda beat a Mustang? We can only give the answers we have. It looks like the Acura RL is a much more reliable car than the other two. I think that is far more important than which AWD is better. It’s a much easier question too.

#18

[i] Anything that gives you better traction has the potential to give you more of a chance of staying on course, rather than going into a ditch.

… if the driver is–like me and like Mike–someone who drives in a sane, rational manner, the added traction and control of a system that drives 4 wheels instead of only 2 wheels has to give that driver a decided advantage. [/i]

I am having a difficult time understanding how four wheel drive would help keep you stop faster (if needed) or keep you from skidding off the road on a curve as opposed to a two wheel drive. I can understand how traction control can help, but that is a different technology. Guys help me out here.

We all agree it is the driver that is most important. I would also suggest that some cars have better balance and for that reason are easier to control on snow and ice, but that is independent of four wheel drive.

#19

Joe, AWD can help keep your vehicle in a better track in my experience on winter conditions with Subaru AWD and our old AMC Eagle. With the AWD off in our AMC Eagle it would be all over the place and harder to steer (it was RWD in 2wd mode). There is less sidesway.

4wd is debatable as I have driven a primitive part time Jeep (CJ-7) and 1990 Toyota 4runner. In really snowy conditions it gives you a much better track also on the road. However in the in between conditions (nearly what most of winter is) of plowed/unplowed roads it can be a deteriment on the drier pavement and absolute help on pure snow pavement. No thanks for me on 4wd unless it has an option of AWD at you finger tips. On the converse the most superior AWD has a locker for the center diff like the old Audi Quattro’s of the 1980’s and into the mid 90’s.

Since I have been driving at 14 (license at 16) for over 20 years I have had a 4wd or AWD vehicle at my disposal. I have also had two FWD’s. I will say a FWD equipped with high quality winter tires(my old Civic) can get you around quite well.

#20

“I am having a difficult time understanding how four wheel drive would help keep you stop faster (if needed) or keep you from skidding off the road on a curve as opposed to a two wheel drive.”

Joseph–Please note that I never said anything about AWD/4WD helping in terms of braking. As to staying on track, I can’t give you anything but subjective experience, and my experience with how AWD vehicles track on slippery roads (as opposed to FWD/RWD) is nothing but positive.