4x4 mods for tundra

toyota
tundra

#1

Would a super charger kit be a good upgrade for a tundra if I’m putting a 4"-6" lift kit with larger tires on my truck??


#2

It sounds like a good upgrade to me, providing you can make it all fit. Certainly would make your truck boss. Unlikely to increase the value of your truck as much as it will cost to install and tune though, so the project will likely be a money loser. But it’s your money and if that’s what you want to spend it on, go for it. Suggest to do a little research first, b/c you may need some cooling system improvements too. A higher center of gravity combined with extra engine power will make the truck more prone to rolling over. Maybe you should budget in for a roll cage too.


#3

More functional mods would be to regear the front and rear diffs to offset the larger tires. Also you’d want a locker (an e-locker would be practical) on the rear at a minimum, with another user-selectable locker on the front ( an e-locker would be better, but an air-locker has the benefit of having an on-board air compressor). skids plates if you don’t already have them, and maybe some wheels with beadlockers. These things would improve the off-road prowess of your truck.


#4

Depends on what you want to do with it.
A supercharger made for the Tundra would work IF it’s done correctly. If not you just might blow your heads through your hood. You need to know what you’re doing.

As to the lift, it’ll adversely affect reliability, longevity, and function. In addition to making loading and unloading more difficult due to the increased height, it’ll increase the angle of the U-joints in the driveshaft. U-joints don’t operate well at increased angles of articulation. The torque is transmitted in a sinusoid-shaped wave that grows greater in amplitude with every additional degree of articulation, not good for smoothness and causing increased wear. The greater weight of the larger tires will also increase rotating inertia and rolling resistance, adding resistance to the drivetrain and increasing wear. In addition, the “sprung to unsprung” weight ration will change in the direction of a harder ride. It will also increase load on other chassis and drivetrain components. Cracking and failure of other chassis components is not at all unheard of.

In short, if you can live with these risks, costs, and issues, go for it.
If you need a reliable daily driver that will ride reasonably and stay reliable for the long term, I recommend against it.


#5

Unless you are 4wheeling through heavy mud, the extra power will be wasted. Gears and airlockers will suit you better for trail busting or rock crawling


#6

Horsepower is for speed. Unless you’re offroading at Baja, you’re barking up the wrong tree. The Unimog is one of the most ridiculously off-road-capable vehicles on the planet, and it tops out at 110hp, and many models are closer to 60hp.