2007 Honda CRV Ignition and Windshield Questions


#1

I purchased a 2007 Honda CRV the end of November 2007. In January, 2008, two problems began. One is frost forming on the inside of the windshield. It happened overnight when my car was parked outside. I went to warm it up and there was 1/16th inch of frost on the inside of the windshield requiring me to scrape it off. I took to service department at dealer who ran “water test” and found no leaks. Honda of America suggested it might be rubber mats I have on the floor of the front seat. Had rubber mats in previously owned Honda Accord but never had frost problem. Anyone else with this problem and, if so, what was the solution?



Second problem is ignition key “sticking”. About 6 times, the ignition key turned almost all the way toward me but wouldn’t move to last position so key would release. Car was in park. The temporary fix was to more forcefully put car in park which seemed to work. Not comfortable with temporary fixes. Dealer service department dismissed because they couldn’t duplicate. Anyone have a similar problem and, if so, what was the resolution?


#2

re leak problem, if this continues, ie, not a one-shot problem, you must have water inside the car somewhere. Check the carpet and the mat under the carpet. If they got wet, they will be a long time drying out. The question is how did the water get in the cat initially.

Is your AC working? defroster on most cars depends upon AC to dehumidify the air for proper defrost action.

Re second problem, seems to me a problem with the switch, or the interlock between the switch and the gear selector. You should drive to the dealer’s lot and get the key “stuck” and then show it to them.


#3
For the key problem, I believe Bill has the right answer. 

For the frost problem, I will add a couple of ideas.  First make sure the car is not working on re-circulate.  You want it on fresh air.  That will help dry out the interior.  

Last, I will suggest that warming up a car is usually not a good idea.  If you are not staying with the car, it increases the chance of someone stealing it.  Second it is better for a car to be driven to warm it up not idling. Idling warms it up slower and can cause some additional wear and it only warms up the engine, it does not help the power steering, transmission or suspension, all of which also need warming up.  If you just don't like the idea of being in a car that is cold, OK it's your decision, it likely will not cause any great damage.  Personally I don't want to bother running out to the car to start it, running back in and then running out again.

#4

One more idea for the windshield: if you live in a snowy area, which I assume you do because you said you warm up your car, make sure you don’t track snow into the car on your shoes. Whenever I do that, the snow melts and my windshield is always frosted over the next day because of the moisture in the car.

My car has the same key problem, but it’s a 1996 Neon and it only does it when it’s cold (I’m not sure whether that’s related, but it’s only happened in the winter). I just have to lightly push the gear shift further into park to get the key out. At my car’s age it’s not something I’m concerned with, but in a new car I’d be upset. I like Bill’s suggestion of taking it back to the dealer and showing them the problem yourself.