2004 Corolla Sport - Engine shot - what to do?

corolla

#1

I have a 2004 Toyota Corolla S with 175k miles… engine overheated and unfortunately the mechanic tell me it’s toast - has zero compression. Not worth the $3500 (estimate) to replace with a used one. What’s the best route from here? Craigslist and sell as-is? It has allow wheels that seem to go for around $100 each, and 80k Michelin tires with a ton of tread (15k at most driven on them). Any suggestions what I should ask for the car if I sell it as is?


#2

This Is A High Miles Car With A Blown Engine. Sell It For Best Offer Or By The Pound To A Salvage Yard.

CSA


#3

Try a craigslist for the whole car first, If it was mine I would try $1,000 and wait for offers and work my way down.


#4

Why would someone buy a car that would be worth 3500.00 in good condition with needing an engine. At 175000 miles it is going to need other things as well. The wheels and tires mean nothing, just have hauled off or maybe the mechanic might give you something for it.


#5

The tires, wheels and trans for someone with a bad trans was my thought why someone might want it.


#6

Will go ahead and put it on CL asking best offer and go from there. Thx for the feedback!


#7

Why hasn’t anybody suggested dropping in a used engine . . . ?

If the rest of the car is in decent shape, not rusty, and well maintained, the car might last several more years


#8

I’m with db on this.


#9

mountainbike

This is off-topic . . .

A few miles from my house, there is a company which sells low mileage japanese engines. they import them from japan, and even offer installation. I know a few guys that have kept their vehicles alive, by going there. I asked about the price, and it sounded fairly reasonable

Of course, I live in Los Angeles, so rust isn’t a major factor here


#10

It is relevant IMHO. That might be a good source for a replacement motor for the OP’s car.
I’ve read that Japanese emissions requirements are so strict that after a certain mileage engines get pulled and replaced, even if they’re still good by our standards. I’ve also read that companies such as the one by your house import them and resell them as replacement engines.

I confess that I don’t know this to be absolute fact, and I’m unfamiliar of any complications if there are any. Someone more worldly than I would have to enlighten us.


#11

mountainbike

I’m not sure about the legalities, either

In fact, I’m doubtful as to whether Japan-spec engines have the same emissions equipment as we do


#12

Good point. I’d welcome input from someone that knows more about this. I’d even gladly buy him/her lunch! :smile:


#13

I could only guess that the Japanese engines probably have to meet at least an emission tier similar to ours and I hear tell that these engines have about 30 K miles on them thats the way I would go ,if I liked the car .


#14

^
I’ve been told that the better used equipment migrates to our shores, from Japan.
When something (either an engine or an entire car) is a mechanical disaster, the Japanese find a ready market for that junk in Russia.


#15

1/2 dozen motors w/125k near us for <$750


#16

I don’t know what the rules are in Japan today, but when I was there in the mid 70’s, after a vehicle is 4 years old, it is required to have a safety and beauty inspection every 6 months. This inspection costs about half the cost of a new vehicle. Luxury vehicles get 6 years before this is required. It was not cost effective for the Japanese to keep a vehicle more than 4 years.

But, the traffic in Japan was so congested that it made rush hour on the Santa Monica freeway look like a speedway. A 7 mile trip from Yokohama to Yokosuka took 2 to 3 hours. A four year old engine with 40,000 kilometers (25k miles) would have more hours of operation on it than a US engine with 200k miles. They were worn plumb out.


#17

There are lots of 2004 Corollas out there. Buy a running one with a few less miles and use the wheels and tires for it. Not all corollas will die at 175,000.