2001 Honda break down


#1

My daughter has a 2001 Honda Civic and the transmission conked out at 45,000 miles. AAMCO in Oakland wants 2700 to rebuild it. This sounds like a lot of money. I know labor is expensive, but wouldn’t a new one cost the same.


#2

Don’t assume that AAMCO or there transmission chain are right when they day the transmission is dead. Find a local INDEPENDENT shop, maybe one recommended by your regular independent mechanic and have them check it. Frankly 45,000 miles is very early for a transmission to go out and those transmission chains have a reputation of being less than … Well let’s say I would not go to one.


#3

Due to many early transmission failures, Honda gave an extended warranty (to 100,000 miles, I think) on '01 Accords. If she is not the original owner, she may not be aware of this extended coverage. I strongly suggest that she contact a Honda dealership regarding this coverage, because if I am correct, she may not have to shell out any money for her transmission.

Of course, this coverage would be predicated on proper maintenance of the transmission, so she should be prepared to prove that the fluid (and the filter, if so equipped) was changed on schedule. If she purchased this as a used car, and if the car was not serviced by a dealership, this may be difficult or impossible to prove, thus indicating one of the many problems associated with buying used cars.

Anyway–in case she is not eligible for Honda’s extended warranty coverage on this car, I want to echo what Mr. Meehan stated. Under no circumstances should you have work performed on this car by AAMCO, or Lee Myles, or Cottman, or any other chain operation.

Seek an independent transmission shop that has been in business for at least three years and that has been recommended to you. The chain operations are notorious for poor quality work, unnecessary repairs, and massive overcharging for those repairs. You are much more likely to get a fair deal from a well-reputed independent transmission shop than from one of those chains.

But, the first course of action is to contact a Honda dealership’s service department a.s.a.p. regarding warranty coverage. If you supply the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), they can tell you if the car is covered by that extended warranty. And, if the car does indeed have extended warranty coverage, that would give very good evidence of AAMCO’s sleaziness for not mentioning that it might possibly be covered by an extended warranty. An honest businessman will report such information to a potential customer, even at the risk of losing business.


#4

so she should be prepared to prove that the fluid (and the filter, if so equipped) was changed on schedule.

I wonder if the first scheduled service would have been before 45,000 miles on the transmission?


#5

I don’t know the maintenance schedule for that model, but hopefully the OP does!

Yes, it is very possible that 60k is the first service interval, but it is also likely that there is an elapsed time value for that service–something like 60k or 5 years, whichever comes first. And, since the car is now 7 years old…


#6

One way to go would be to have a shop rebuild the transmission. However, I suggest that you look into replacing the transmission with a new/used transmission imported from Japan. I have not needed to replace a transmission on any of my Hondas. I have replaced three engines that I got from Attarco, Inc. in Richmond, CA. They specialized in new/used/rebuilt Japanese engines and transmissions. I have had great success with their used and rebuilt engines. I estimate that you should be able to buy a used transmission and have it installed at an independent shop for one-half what AAMCO was going to charge you. Good luck! :slight_smile:

Check out: www.attarco.com - - - 510-233-6666- - - - 1-800-747-1111 (inside CA)


#7

I really hope that the OP looks into possible extended warranty coverage from Honda prior to spending any money!