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1999 Honda Accord won't start in the rain

The Honda Accord turns over but won’t start. This only happens when it’s raining. It will start in the cold and snow but not when raining. I have replaced spark plugs and wires. The battery shows a full charge.

The next most probable culprit would be a distributor cap. Did the wires also include a coil wire?

Buy one new spark plug. Carry the plug with you and the next time it does not start, get out and pull one plug wire off (pull on the socket part not the wire) put the new plug on that wire and hold the threads of the plug tight against the engine block while you have someone try to start the car. You should see a bright blue spark, and if you are not holding the plug with an insulated tool, you will also see stars! This can rule out a spark problem.

Here is the answer to my own question. I replaced the spark plugs, torqued them properly and the car started up right away. My guess is the plugs were not properly torqued when originally put in and were not working optimally, and also perhaps, had become defective.

. My guess is the plugs were not properly torqued

That’s a new one on me. Plugs are NOT like head bolts where they need to be torqued to a specific spec. Just torque till tight. This seems weird to me.

Actually plugs do have torque specs - BUT - I’m pretty sure that has mostly to do with protecting the head & threads from over torque, or keeping the plugs from getting loose from under torque. It shouldn’t interfere with the operation of the plugs in any way. So I’m not buying the idea that improper torque created this problem. The only way I could imagine it is if the plugs were so loose that they were ready to fall out - which seems unlikely.

How about proper seating of the wires? (Getting them to “click” on) Or the use of a boot grease? (which seals out moisture).

sometimes you get leakage from the wires and crossfiring when very wet…look at the engine when it is dark outside and wet and see if you see any leakage or evidence of stray electric current. And MAKE SURE THAT YOU USE a proper thread coating on the plugs to avoid what many find out too late, that the plugs freeze into the aluminum and corrode and make changing impossible or very difficult. With the long service interval this is necessary.

AutoZone sells a tool for this test . . . I got one for about $10 . . . it works on anything with a spark plug and eliminates the shocking factor. It’s neat, too . . . can adjust the little screw thing to see how strong your spark is . . . how far it will jump the gap, instead of just looking for color (bright blue vs. blue?). My vote is on the cap and rotor. Rocketman

I have the same problem w/ a 1998 Accord. Were you able to resolve the problem? If so, what was causing the problem? would like to pass that info on to the mechanic…

206007075,
Doncondon changed the spark plugs and spark plug wires, the distributor cap and rotor, and it worked great!

Actually plugs do have torque specs - BUT - I’m pretty sure that has mostly to do with protecting the head & threads from over torque, or keeping the plugs from getting loose from under torque.

I agree…Every single bolt on every car has a torque spec…But it will have NOTHING to do with the operation of spark plugs.

Had all of the above changed worked fine…Ran into a monsoon died out instantly. If u are having this issue, plugs and wires cap and points are not the answer