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Induction cleaning

My Toyota dealer insists that I must have an induction cleaning occasionally. Is it really necessary?
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Comments

  • edited February 2010
    No.
  • edited February 2010
    Absolutely not. Waste of money.
  • edited February 2010
    You might want to get the throttle body cleaned as a preventive every 100K miles.
  • edited February 2010
    No, and find yourself a good independent shop, you'll save $$.
  • edited February 2010
    Just a sales gimmick. On some older cars, that have carbon buildup in the induction system caused by abnormal operating conditions, it could make sense, but to do it "occasionally", no, unless it says to in the owner's manual, which is highly unlikely. I would love to see

    you pin this person down in a constructive but relentless way and make him explain exactly why this has to be done if it's not mentioned in the owner's manual. If he says it's because you may get deposits inside the intake manifold or something like that, ask him why that should happen on a quality make like Toyota that's well maintained. Please post back.

    Of course, I understand you not wanting to get in a stressful situation vis-a-vis you and the dealer, but it boils my blood when I hear about these sales gimmicks. Once in a while, they may be legit, but hardly ever.
  • edited February 2010
    No.

    It's sole purpose when suggested as a periodic service is to prevent you from developing excess deposits in your bank account.
  • edited February 2010
    Some salesman from the maker of the induction cleaning machine stopped by the shop a few weeks ago and told the service writer the wonders their machine will do to their customers car, and how much money they can make off it. The service writer then tells the salesman "You had me at 'Hello'", proceeds to tell everyone they need it done in order to garner more profit for the dealership, and makes people feel that their vehicle will keel over if they don't do the induction cleaning.
  • edited February 2010
    Newer cars have the fuel injectors in the intake port near the intake valve, so all that is pulled through the induction plumbing is filtered air. The plumbing upstream of the air cleaner might get dusty, but that's usually nothing to worry about.
  • edited February 2010
    A friend of mine was a mechanic at a GMC dealer. He got in trouble because he wasn't selling enough engine flushes. He still refused to sell them if they wern't needed, which they hardly ever were.
  • edited February 2010
    Actually, there can be considerable back flow from the exhaust system to the intake manifold. On most engines, the intake valve already starts opening before the exhaust valve is completely closed. During that overlap period, the intake manifold's vacuum can suck exhaust gas backward into the intake manifold, especially while idling.

    With race car cams, this effect can be so extreme that the engine idles like a two-stoke engine.

    This is why carbon and other combustion chamber deposits find their way into the intake ports. Are these deposits harmful? Probably not.
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