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Wheel ramps or jack stands to change oil?

I did what CSA did, I have a 3 step. My old ramps did not give enough clearance for the plastic air dam so I needed a more gradual rise and the wood was just fine. Strong & low cost.

I prefer ramps for oil changes. I only use jack stands if I’m going to remove the wheels.

Edit: I have short plastic ramps for cars with low clearance and taller metal ramps for higher vehicles, like my mother’s minivan.

The problem I have with ramps is that it’s difficult to get many low slung or short nose cars up on the ramps short of working with some 2 Xs to lengthen the approach.

Sometimes it’s easier to just pay a facility 29.95 to do it for you. It also shoves the oil disposal issue off onto the facility.

asemaster: "I may be biased since I'm a mechanic by trade but I recommend a good local independent garage for your oil change services. Sure beats the hassle of buying your parts and doing it yourself and disposing of your filter and waste oil."

My desire to be thorough, (others call it OCD), makes me want to do it myself.
With toilet paper I thoroughly clean the oil filter area, dipstick tube opening, oil cap opening so no road grit gets into the engine. Then I do other tasks ordered by my wife to let the oil drain longer.
Plus, the other emergencyehicle is present when a hospital invariably calls.
During Tuesday’s 129-mile emergeny transport, the hospital called three times wanting ETA of their blood platelets. (Does a GPS calculate arrival time based upon vehicle speed or determined by speed limits on the route of travel?)

I ride my bicycle to Wal-Mart with used oil and used poodle in my backpack and buy new oil and filter.

If you use ramps…make sure to use jack stands as well. I once had a set of brand new ramps collapse while I was in the garage looking for tools. Whew…

Wow! What was the weight of your vehicle? Metal ramps?

Metal ramps and it was a '67 Pontiac GTO. The ramps were a one piece design that was later modified with metal bars added to the sides to strengthen them. I just got my money back and never bought any again. I had just crawled out from under the “Goat” after removing the oil pan. My life flashed before my eyes when I saw the crumpled ramps.

Does a GPS calculate arrival time based upon vehicle speed or determined by speed limits on the route of travel?

Speed limits. Some add in traffic slowdown areas along your route. If you are exceeding the speed limit, you can watch it update your ETA accordingly.

My smartphone app (Google Maps) has a switch that allows data transfer, if you are in cell tower range, for real-time traffic alerts and adjustments. It works very well. It even re-routes you if you allow.

Just for the record, I do my tire rotations while I do oil changes so I use 4 jack stands, wheels off, the old oil goes back into the 5 qt container the new oil came from and I take it with me to be recycled the next time I go to the auto parts store.

I don’t trust metal ramps. Plastic ramps, however, I do. On plastic ramps the entire weight is carried directly below. The forces holding the wheel up are carried solely via compression directly to the pavement. I also pay the few extra bucks to get ramps with a higher load rating than I think I might need by at least 50%.

"I ride my bicycle to Wal-Mart with used oil and used poodle in my backpack and buy new oil and filter. "

@Robert Gift

I’m just a little bit curious… how does a used poodle come into play during this recycling/purchasing adventure? And… doesn’t the oil container squash your poodle in the backpack? :neutral:

Oh… and what is a used poodle? How is it different from any other poodle?

CSA

I wish I had a molding shop. I’ll bet that plastic ramps that could allow drive up of today’s modern cars with low fascia panels to a height high enough to allow working under would sell like hotcakes. They’d be long, but they could be two locking pieces per ramp. I’ve been looking for some for years.

I don’t use either, but if I did, I’d use ramps. I’m thin enough so I just jack the front end a little and no problem. I always had problems with ramps sliding on the garage floor so what I did was weld a piece of the slotted steel on the bottom front of each ramp. Then I drilled a few holes in the concrete at appropriate places. I use a bolt through the slotted steel and into the hole in the garage floor and the ramps stay solid no matter what. I can adjust them right or left for differing wheel bases and where the car happens to be. I use the plastic Christmas tree plugs with a little rubber gas line on them to plug the holes when not in use. Can’t hardly see them in the floor and its a very fool proof method. Don’t need a second person to spot where I am. Works for me.

Maybe we should start a thread on garage organization and nifty features. I love those strut channels for hanging tools like miter saws, grinders, etc.

Not long ago, I bought a 2009 Sienna here in Mexico. I had the 2002 oil change down to a science. On this one, I haven’t even found where the oil filter is. Chilton tells exactly how to change the filter, but I did not see that it said where the filter is. When I have to, I will go to Sienna Chat and find out.

On the 2002 I knew exactly how much to tighten everything and never had any leakage. On this one, I am a bit nervous. I suppose I will carry an extra filter and 5 quarts of oil just in case until I develop confidence again.

On the 2002, I would wait until back at the mobile home in McAllen, and pull it in the car port, which has a concrete floor. Next to it it is dirt, several inches lower. Using my old WWII shelter half under me, I reach up and access all I need to access.

common sense answer "I'm just a little bit curious... how does a used poodle come into play during this recycling/purchasing adventure? And... doesn't the oil container squash your poodle in the backpack? Oh... and what is a used poodle? How is it different from any other poodle?"

He is a recycled white toy poodle from the animal shelter. We could not afford a new one so got a pre-owned one. When they brought him into our meeting room, my wife thought he was smiling. She named him Sheeler - means “smile/happy” in Mandarin Chinese.

We do not leave him at home in case of a fire or burglary. He rides in the backpack in a pocket above the oil container.

My desire to be thorough, (others call it OCD), makes me want to do it myself.
With toilet paper I thoroughly clean the oil filter area, dipstick tube opening, oil cap opening so no road grit gets into the engine. Then I do other tasks ordered by my wife to let the oil drain longer.

Well I can guarantee you weren’t getting that level of detail for $8.54 at Walmart, and you won’t get it anywhere else either. But if the satisfaction of doing it yourself is what you’re after, then by all means do it yourself using a set of quality jack stands placed properly.

I’m surprised nobody mentioned using the roll of toilet paper as an oil filter cartridge :naughty:

I heard this was once popular among some individuals

I’ve posted an old CLICK AND CLACK article, where they talk about Frantz filters

If anybody flags me for abuse or spam, you are a loser, because my remark IS automotive, and I’ve posted a vintage Tom and Ray discussion :smirk:

Frantz oil filters were not an unusual sight 40 to 50 years ago, I had a truck with a Frantz filter. I don’t see how this is good advice today, place me on your loser list.

@Nevada_545

WTH . . . did you NOT see the “naughty” emoticon . . . ?!

That means I do NOT promote using toilet paper as an oil filter cartridge

Seriously, I’m kind of surprised you misinterpreted my posting that badly

I was merely being a smart aleck AND posting a vintage Tom and Ray discussion

You didn’t flag me, so I can’t add you to the list :smirk:

Perhaps I should have addressed my initial comment directly to Robert Gift . . . that would have left no doubt whatsoever, that I was NOT being serious

Sorry, but you were far too gullible, at least in this particular situation :wink:

How does this add to the topic? Are you trying to drift off into your own conversation?

A Carry-All I worked on in thearly 1970s had the toilet paper roll filter.
I changed it and recall unwinding a new roll to get it to squeeze into the metal canister.

The oil ALWAYS LOOKED CLEAN AND NEW! Appears that it was an EXCELLENT FILTER!
Owner had 300k miles and never anything done to his engine. Excellent for a 1960’s vehicle, yes!