Wheel bearings/ hub 2011 Chevy Aveo


#1

Let me start at the beginning. I travel a lot for work. Over 1,000 miles a week. I was up in Temple and was hearing that loud helicopter landing on my roof noise that was either bearings or tires.

4 tires later, the sound was just louder. So, bearings. I took it to a mechanic there I Temple because I was 400 miles from my own mechanic. They changed the front wheel bearings for right at $600.

Fast forward to 29 days later. I start hearing the sounds again. Seriously? Had the tires rotated so it's not them. Take it to another branch if the same shop I went to less than three months ago.

As I am a female, for whatever reason, the go to reaction to my suggestions is that I have no idea what I'm talking about. But, after taking a test drive they are forced to agree. Wheel bearings again.

Here's where it gets sticky. It's under warranty, obviously. They call the other shop and get a go ahead to do the bearings again. For free.

I leave my car (which given a choice I would not do but I have to work so ...yeah) and get a call. I should upgrade the bearings. The other shop put on crap bearings and that's why they died so fast. I say "No. Just put the EXACT SAME BEARINGS on the car again." There is general irritation from the shop and then agreement. I paid $75 per bearing last time which is about standard, is it not?

Guaranteed for noon the next day. They have to return the "faulty" bearings so they can't give them back to me (sigh). That's fine. I tell them NOT to send them back until I have taken pictures if the "faulty" old ones and have the boxes of the new (exact same) ones. Still with me?

Now I show up to get my car and they are scrambling all around because it's not my bearings that are the problem but the wheel hub. OMFG!!! They want me to buy new hubs now.

So question. At $600, should the first shop have changed the entire hub assembly or at least have noticed a bad hub while changing the bearings? If I had "upgraded" the bearings would the hub have been a problem at all? As I did not allow them to replace the hub, how long before the bearings go bad again? And what should I be looking for on the hub that destroys the bearings. Or are they just blowing smoke up my a**? Is there some way to make sure they replaced the bearings and didn't just pack the old ones with grease since with the whole hub fiasco I forgot to ask got my old bearings.

Thanks for any thoughts.


#2

The parts are all one piece as far as I know.


#3

See? That’s what I thought but not according to them.


#4

The wheel bearings can be replaced in your vehicle with the special proper/specified tools.

But if you don’t have these special proper/specified tools, damage to the bearing can occur during installation.

That’s why the entire hub assembly is replaced.

Tester


#5

“I Temple” ? what is that?

If this is a chain, like Pep Boys, then that is the problem.

You have to keep pushing them. If they installed poor bearings, that is their problem and they are obligated to fix it.


#6

The bearings probably have to be pressed into the hub, it’s a friction fit. If the hole where they press into the hub has enlarged or is damaged for some reason, the new bearings won’t fit tightly. That could happen for example if the first bearings were so seized up they were turning on themselves inside that hole as you were driving & hearing that loud noise. I expect that is what happened, which damaged the hub. Replacing the hub and with a new bearing should fix you up ok.

You mentioned this was just for the right side front I think. I’d suggest you replace both hubs and install new bearings on the front. Right and left. Then you’ll need an alignment.

If Chevy will do this as part of their warranty – which sort of surprises me on a 2011 – that should work out for you fine, right?


#7

I’m pretty sure they have to be pressed in. I did have it fixed the first time. Temple is a city. I was at a Meineke.

It was both bearings in the front. They fixed them. Said nothing about the hubs being enlarged and damaged. Then less than 3 months later the same bearings went bad again so I took it back to Meineke (who warranty their work for 90 days) and it was the 2nd place who said the hub was the problem and wearing out the bearings.

Sorry if I wasn't clear. I just wonder why they didn't replace the entire assembly to begin with and if my hubs are bad how long before they destroy the new bearings? And is there a way to tell if the bearings even got replaced because now I'm wondering if they even did it. You know?

Also, is it likely that both hubs are bad? That seems excessive.


#8

@BillRussell

I take it that Temple is a city or town


#9

Yes.


#10

I just did a front bearing on a 2007 Avero 20011 same job. Any shop has the right tools for the job. A shop press is the main item they will use. But you are being feed so many different things here you must be confused. There are 3 parts to the front. #1 The hub (the part with the lug nut threads on it) It has a long shaft on the back side few inches long #2 The bearing it self which has a hole in the center. #3 The steering Knuckle ( the part that the tie rod and ball joint attaches to) also has a hole in the center. Summary The Bearing is pressed into the knuckle with the 20 ton shop press then the hub is pressed into the hole in the bearing and it’s then all one peice. For a better visual ALWAYS go to a parts store web page and look it up like you were buying it. You then at least have a picture in your mind what they are selling you. PS you can easily see the bearing is only $30 at Autozone. PSS it’s rare to have to replace the hub portion unless the bearings were so torn up that they destroyed everything but you were still driving and just hearing noise. I say they were just making up for lost profit. Again the hub very rare. And you can’t buy it all in one piece. They only sell it as 3 separate parts.

Me pressing the hub into the bearing which is already pressed into the knuckle (big part on the bottom


#11

@skulldrinker

That looks like a new hub . . . no offense, but I don’t think anybody could get a 9-year old hub to look that clean

Was it as rusty as that backing plate?

Or was it severely out-of-round?

Nice avatar, BTW :naughty:


#12

I was wondering if someone was going to call me on that. I said replacing the hub is rare but in this case the person bought all the parts and brought them over and wanted it all installed. Actually the bearing job in that picture was a 2005 Honda Oddesy. The procedure for the Avero is exactly the same step by step. Let me search for the picture of the 07 Avero I know it should be here somewhere. I usually snap pictures for my Facebook page. Sorry for misspelling Aveo


#13

@skulldrinker

Are you running your own shop?

If so, I’m somewhat surprised that you would let the customer supply all the parts themselves


#14

I looked at parts, a bearing was under 40, a bearing and hub was under 90. Why waste the time on a bearing only

http://www.autozone.com/1/categories/chevrolet-aveo5-wheel-bearing-hub-assemblies


#15

Sorry for misspelling Aveo

Below Knuckle removed in bearing replacment job (2005 Honda Oddessy)
Knuckle removed in bearing replacment job (2005 Honda Oddessy)
Below Pressing the Bearing in the Honda Oddessy Steering Knuckle (2005 Honda Oddessy)

Below Here is the 06 Chevy Avero start of the bearing job
Here is the 06 Chevy Avero start of the bearing job
Below steering knucle removed from front end 2006 Avero
Steering knucle removed from front end
Below First step disassemble removing the Hub 2006 Avero"


Below Begin assembly press in bearing into Knuckle first step 2006 Avero
Begin assembly press in bearing into Knuckle first step 2006 Avero
Below Final press the Hub into the bearing and knuckle assembly 2006 Avero
Final press the Hub into the bearing and knuckle assembly 2006 Avero

Below Totally different style Hub Bearing all one piece no assembly require. 2006 Chevy Equinox
Totally different style Hub Bearing all one piece no assembly require. 2006 Chevy Equinox
text


#16

@Barkydog That looks like a rear wheel bearing. All my comment are aimed at the front.


#17

@db4690

Let me first say I do not own a shop. I am my own boss and do whatever I want. I take breaks I play on the computer I drink O’Douls I listen to loud music. Who the hell wants to work for a boss. I worked for a short time in a couple of shops. At the shop auto repair suddenly became NO FUN. Currently I have no ASE’s I don’t need them I am the boss LOL. So I lable myself as an auto repair enthusiast working from home. My facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/skulldrinkers-Man-Cave-113610592085084

I don’t mean to hi-jack this thread with my personal info.


#18

@skulldrinker

I for one liked the pictures. Very informative. The pictures say it all, words were not really needed in this instance

Those adapters . . . did they all come with the press?

And what’s with the red paint?

You’re a pretty handy guy . . . I saw that evap smoke machine you fabricated on your page. Saved yourself several hundred bucks there. What liquid are you using?


#19

@db4690

Smoke Machine was made by Brian B on You Tube. Here is one of his videos.


It burns Baby Oil (I use Johnson & Johnson brand) It has a few bells and whistles paid a little over $200 for it.

The shop press is your basic run of the mill Harbor Freight 20 Ton press.
The adapters I use are from a collection of a few kits listed below. As you can see from the other pictures sometimes you have to improvise and use sockets.

Front Wheel Bearing Adapters


10 Piece Bearing Race and Seal Driver Set
http://www.harborfreight.com/10-piece-bearing-race-and-seal-driver-set-95853.html
Ball Joint Service Kit for 2WD and 4WD Vehicles
http://www.harborfreight.com/ball-joint-service-kit-for-2wd-and-4wd-vehicles-60827.html
14 Piece Master Ball Joint Adapter Set

As for the red paint…I use red and blue paint on just about every single item little as 1/4" sockets and on up and screwdrivers to hammers. If is’t SAE it gets red paint if it’s metric it gets blue. Always done that it’s a habit I picked up from my dad 40 years ago. Also it’s a dead give-away when you see a red socket in the box of the mechanic next to you.

Like how else would you seperate them? Here’s a shot of my little tool box top tray. See how organized it is with color. These sockets I bought in the 70’s and they’ve resprayed many times because it gets scratched off in useage.
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53732364/red_blue.jpg

Thanks for visiting my page give it a like if you want.


#20

I’d like to check out the photo’s too, but because I’m not a facebook person most of the photo’s are blocked.

Too bad, I saw a few good ideas I’d like to incorporate.

Yosemite