What is this thing/heap of junk?


#21

Well, I’ll rather have our kind of TMG than have any of YCG (Your Current Government).

I did not tell or ask You to and I don’t care.
I simply explained how it works here. Whether it’s good or bad is up to each owns opinion.
Kind regards
A Danish European.


#22

I’m not a Denmark fan either. I read the series of detective books by a Danish author (can’t remember his name right now) but he often referred to the vast government programs from fire arms control to housing. Not my cup of tea. I prefer freedom and self-sufficiency.


#23

Took me a while to decide this is “pickup”.

sorry to be negative, but to me it’s easier to type “pickup”, no upper case letters, and much less prone to misunderstanding.


#24

So sorry! You sir are absolutely correct. I hate it when people do what I did. (Shot by my own gun) I put P/U for pick up because I had just referred to pick up (written out) eight words back. No excuse.

Thanks for pointing it out. I will try much harder, seriously. :grimacing:

Live by the sword, die by the sword! :anguished:
CSA


#25

I don’t know if it was something abandoned to get it out of someone’s yard. People usually just leave them in the yard with trees growing up all around them in these parts.

I agree with all the taxes and such being excessive. Some things make sense though. I wish the tire disposal fee was charged upfront so there would be no cost once the tires were worn out. We pay the disposal fee of $1.75 or $2.00 per tire (truck and tractor tires are more) when they are taken off and we no longer want them. People don’t want to pay to dispose of them so they end up in ditches. Some put them in the trash behind businesses and puts the cost on someone else. If the cost of their disposal was paid upfront and all tires with a date code of XXXX or newer were known to have fallen under the program, any tire dealer could just take them knowing that they would be disposed of.
There is a disposal fee for lead batteries that is done this way. You can get this core charge back when you buy a new battery and turn the old one in. There is a lesser amount you get back just by taking in an old battery for recycling, no matter if you go to an auto parts store or scrap yard.

Scrap metal value seems quite variable. For a time it was really up high and people were taking in old junk and cleaning up their yards as it paid for them to do so and quite well at that. Now I bet the cost of the gas to get it there doesn’t pay for the load. I recycle my junk from my farm and business (computer/electronics trash). The farm stuff is mostly just junk metal which brings maybe a cent or two per lb. Some of the electronics stuff is actually quite valuable so that offsets hauling in the junk that costs more to haul than it is worth.

There was a time when a lot of the illegal dumps around here got cleaned up. I know a forestry ranger and he said there was a time when you would fill out a report for every occurrence of dumping found and then he would either load it into his truck for disposal or note in the report to have someone come get it. Then scrap prices went up and they pretty much quit bothering to write reports about appliances and such that were dumped. They would come back a few days later and someone would have picked them up for scrap. Now I bet this isn’t the case.

As for the taxes and fees to pay for free electricity and phone service for the low-income people, I have very mixed opinions about this. Some people are truly in need. Then there are others that are lazy and working the system. These are the worst people to deal with and I have all but written them off as potential customers due to all the problems they cause. In my business I always have to deal with really spoiled rotten people who don’t want to pay for anything when all the disability benefits and such come out on the 3rd of the month. I always have to watch out for crazies on the 3rd of the month. The full moon or ides of March don’t scare me but the 3rd of the month does! It is like they come out of the woodwork for a couple days and then all the money is spent and they don’t re-appear until next month. This is when the people with rancid BO are out in the stores and you see people getting taken out of Wal-Mart in handcuffs.


#26

I think the abandoners figured the tires were worth more than the jackstands


#27

Here is another classic although it looks like this one still runs and drives. They used to make them like battleships! This makes me think of the stories about the WWII bombers flying home with half a wing missing and such.


#28

Maybe it has a lot of parking tickets, dmv fees, it was stolen, or the title isn’t clear, making it problematic to take to a junkyard to sell for scrap. Same reason you see old mattresses on the side of the road sometimes. It’s the best solution available to the person who possesses the car.


#29

I have taken junk cars in for scrap before. These were “parts cars” and were bought without titles. In one case a person had used my property to take parts off one of these on my property since I am in the country and out of sight. The hulk was left behind and it was up to me to deal with the eyesore.

You cannot take a car in for scrap with the gas tank and the oil pan intact. The fluids must be drained and a hole must be present. In my case the entire engine had been pulled and the gas tank was also removed as a spare so that wasn’t an issue.

They also only need the title for a “complete car”, at least in Missouri. In my case the thing had all the doors removed and the body was cut into two parts with a torch so it could be loaded up in a truck. The “complete car” thing is open to interpretation but this one and others I have taken in were in many parts and couldn’t be re-assembled. This is the redneck way to scrap a car.


#30

If you had a way to cut it into small enough pieces you could throw a car away piece by piece along with the weekly garbage. Similar to how WW II soldiers would mail a jeep home, bit by bit. I’ll bet this has been done by somebody, somewhere.


#31

It would be hard to imagine someone mailing a Jeep home that way, some of the parts are big. However, I think more than one G.I. mailed a M1911 or captured Luger pistol home one piece at a time.


#32

Weapons are one of the more common things that get mailed home “one piece at a time” from what I understand. This still goes on in modern times as well.


#33

Here in NY State there is no need to remove gas or oil to junk a car, the scrapyards are happy to take whatever you have and you don’t have to go there they will still pay you and come tow it away.
We do have to drain the gas and oil to throw out a lawnmower or snowblower.


#34

Hej hr. Dansker: I thought Asterix was a Frenchman (a Gaul, actually, but not a Dane.)

We keep tires and batteries from being dumped by charging a disposal fee when we buy them that funds their recycling. I think that’s the right way to deal with everything, since it all ends up as trash eventually. Charge a disposal fee on everything, pay for trash pickup out of it. Freelancers pick up scrap for recycling now; if we put a price on old TVs, stereos, computers, furniture… then we could count on them to pick up all the abandoned junk. Why charge people to throw their trash away? We want them to throw it away.

I live in trash-strewn Albuquerque: flood drainage ditches, catchment basins, alleys, even the *&$%! sidewalk. The guy going through the trash for aluminum would recycle it way more cheaply than the city sanitation crew.

An annual fee is the wrong way to go about it: collect at POS. Refund it when a guy sells the car.


#35

California charges a recycling fee when you buy electronic gear. I just paid $5 when I bought my wife an iPad. There are frequent free recycling days where you can bring in TV’s, computers, wire, all sorts of electric devices, and they get recycled. There’s a fee to recycle a tire when it’s taken off, which probably should be charged when you buy it, to fund a tire recycling system.


#36

If you go to a demo derby, there will be cars with hardly anything left or the frames bent in a V and the things still running. Takes a lot to stop a car provided the radiator still works.

I don’t remember exactly when but Minnesota started a paint recycling fee. Now every time you buy a can of paint there is a fee tacked on for when you throw it away. It’s not much but sales tax started out at 1%, and property tax used to be based on what you paid for a house and it would never go up until it was sold again. That was like 1955. Just saying, foot in door.


#37

Don’t look too bad. A little duct tape here and there and it will look like new.


#38

Here in PA, every time we buy a bottle of booze, we pay a tax…to rebuild after the Johnstown flood! (For those unaware, the flood happened in 1889, when a dam failed on the Conemaugh river.)

Hence the problem with taxes: even when enacted for the best of reasons, they can get diverted from their desired effect, extended long beyond the need, etc.


#39

Wasn’t that a private dam with the private hunting lodge. Carnege comes to mind and his friends.


#40

Yes, the club was run by Henry Frick, the man that ran Carnegie Steel for Andrew Carnegie. The story goes that he wanted to drive over the earthen dam but the crown was so too rounded. He had the top taken off so that he could drive over. As it turned out, that allowed water to run over the top of the dam in a heavy rainstorm. When that occurred, the dam was washed away. Frick was in Pittsburgh when the dam burst.

There have been several floods in Johnstown. The most recent was in the late 1970s IIRC. My cousin’s row home in Johnstown had a foot of mud on the first floor. The inclined plane that runs up the mountain from Johnstown to Westmont is kept running for the next flood; we just don’t know when.