What is this hose called?

toyota
coolant
corolla

#1

Hi. My Toyota Corolla (1995) has a seeping hose. It is a short hose, maybe 6-8 inches long, and is about 3 inches in width. It has something to do with the coolant, I think a bypass hose?



Anyway I live in small town in Southern AZ. The guy who fixes cars here is not a great business person and I never know if he is ripping me off. The part will cost $15 and the three times I have spoken to him about it he changes how long it will take to fix. He charges hourly and does not give flat rates for anything. I never know if I am paying for his cigarette breaks or bad mood. He estimated anywhere from one to four hours for the repair. I want to know what the hose is called so I can get an estimate from a shop in a near by town. Four hours and the price tag that goes along with that seems excessive for the job.



The hose is visible when looking into the hood but kind of tucked under some stuff. It is on the left side closer to the back when looking into the hood from the front of the car. I asked him what it was called and he was not sure.

Thank you!!


#2

If it’s three inches in diameter it’s the main radiator hose. If it’s the lower one it could require removal of surrounding hardware to remove and replace the hose. But he should be able to provide an estimate of what it’ll cost. There are labor standards for this work, and unless he suspects it’s something other than the hose, like perhaps the water pump, he should be able to give you a stable quote.


#3

That would be the thermostat housing water inlet hose.

Tester


#4

Cool. And to think I always just called it the lower radiator hose…

I don’t have access to a repair database anymore. Any idea what he labor standard is for this job?


#5

“The part will cost $15 and the three times I have spoken to him about it he changes how long it will take to fix. He charges hourly and does not give flat rates for anything.”

This is basically a “time & materials” type of estimate, which isn’t really an estimate at all. Way too open ended–in the mechanic’s favor if he so chooses. Go elsewhere.


#6

OP:
While I agree his “time & materials” estimates may be frustrating, you need to ask yourself:

  • do you trust this mechanic?
  • is he fair with his labor charges?
  • does he tend to be dependable with fixing problems correctly?
  • has he taken good care of your car?

Good mechanics you can trust are hard to find and are worth keeping.