Water pump style


#1

website has pump pictured on right. that is the only pump they stock. same as oem. has cast impeller vanes. the pump on left is what they sent. no big deal? yes its cheaper to make i suppose. i asked them why delivered item did not match pic and they sent another one. now i have 2.


#2

You won’t know until you remove yours what the OEM design is - if you now have the OEM. I bought a water pump at nearby O’Reilly’s a few years ago and couldn’t get it in place without the o-ring falling out. Rather than gunk it up I took it back to the store and they said I could return it. They had two other pumps in stock listed as correct for my vehicle. I had bought the cheapest one. One of the others they showed me was a much better quality casting and the o-ring fit more securely. I paid the few extra bucks and had no problems with it. Good luck to you.


#3

To me it would be a “big deal” because it plays a critical role in the vehicle’s reliability and longevity.

Without being an engineer and having vehicles and pumps to experiment with then compare data, I’d think it’s an educated guess as to whether or not it is a big deal.

Seat covers? License plate frames? Sure! Just my opinion, but I don’t play “close enough” when buying parts for cars, especially crucial pieces. I want my parts to look the same unless I have proof that the part design was improved by the manufacturer.

Is that part made by a leading pump manufacturer? You should be able to call them (the manufacturer, not O’R) and get technical help.
CSA
:palm_tree::sunglasses::palm_tree:


#4

I can’t imagine the one on the left having the capacity as the one on the right - not as many vanes on the impeller and a lot more openings for the coolant to work around a vane.

Methinks a return is in order and finding another supplier.


#5

What does rockauto show?


#6

Does the the part number match OEM? Also are you still running WinXP?


#7

DNJ (Domestic-N-Japanese) Engine Components

Info: Contact numbers and parts catalog
http://www.enginecomponents.com/en/contact
CSA
:palm_tree::sunglasses::palm_tree:


#8

Since you have two now, install the first one and see if it holds the temperature as well as the old one you just removed. If it does the job ok, even if this one starts to leak or fail later, you have a backup. I expect they both can pump at the required flow rate to keep the engine cool. If you are planning on towing a big trailer up a steep hill in Death Valley in August, stick to an oem unit you buy at a dealership. Otherwise, I’d just give it a try.


#9

That’s a reasonable view, and maybe the temp gauge will indicate a slightly higher temp than with the OEM pump because the situation might be like that of an aftermarket vs OEM radiator.

A few years back, I changed out an original copper-brass radiator (with scale / deposits) with an aftermarket aluminum one which left the temp gauge showing a slightly higher temp, but no problems with cooling – even going thru mountains up and down about 4000 feet (no towing though).


#10

such is life. car 1 went in bodyshop last friday. car 2 leaked on tuesday. it was not a drip. there was a puddle of coolant under the motor. seemed to decided to spring a big leak
i was working from home that week so i found the dnj part with next day shipping
for 28 delivered. autozone was 66 with next day delivery also. went with dnj as the part on website has cast vanes. i figured the delivered part would match pic? opened box and huh? since i was sorta trapped at home with no backup car i put in the dnj part
seems to hold same temp. yes the removed pump has cast vanes
i use my old dell desktop for internet use. i do not use it for anything else. i have a new I7 laptop with docking station for work use. i have 3 monitors mounted to wall at my home work station. so i usually have both computers running side by side i


#11

a rule of thumb is: whenever a replacement parts manufacturer has replaced the OE part with something plastic: run away from it; I spend all day reading about auto repairs; most nowadays are caused by bad “OEM” [read: cheap stuff made to look like OE] replacement parts substituted for “OE” [Original Equipment] parts