Used car : BMW or Mercedes?


#1

which do you prefer - used BMW or used Mercedes and why?

thanks for your opinions…


#2

I like some models of each, but they are completely different animals. What type of car are you looking for and how much are you planning on spending?


#3

Are you shopping for transportation or a status symbol? WE don’t care what kind of car you drive. When you say “used”, how used? A run-out Benz or Beemer will provide you with the highest cost per mile traveled there is…


#4

around $10k…


#5

around the $10K…
around 75,000 miles
and not older than 10 yeras


#6

I’m not sure you are going to find a decent late model benz or BMW for $10K. You will find some really beat late model cars or some better older ones. IMHO, the older ones are much cooler (I have a couple), but they are a bit of a hobby. You are probably looking at closer to $20K if you want a late model driver that’s not a maintenance hog. Honestly, if you only want to spend $10K on a daily driver you should look into one of the ricer clones (I know - I feel the same way).


#7

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/BMW-5-Series-2000-BMW-528i-RARE-5sp-NoRESERV-LOADED-MINT-CARFAX-528_W0QQcmdH

ZHViewItemQQcategoryZ6008QQihZ009QQitemZ190124222870QQrdZ1


#8

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/BMW-5-Series-2000-BMW-528i-RARE-5sp-NoRESERV-LOADED-MINT-CARFAX-528_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQcategoryZ6008QQihZ009QQitemZ190124222870QQrdZ1


#9

nice…


#10

what would you reccomend?
( price and vehicle type)
thanks…


#11

If you are interested in something like this, do yourself a favor and have a good pre-purchase inspection performed by a dealer or an independent bmw shop, expect to spend a couple $100 for the inspection. Be very careful of eBay cars, especially if you don’t have a chance to inspect them in person.


#12

yup, and not a maintanance hog either.


#13

Craig,

thanks for all the 411.

appreciate it broddah


#14

MB reliability has fallen into the toilet sadly of recent years. BMW still remains pretty decent being average to above average.

Both are pricey to repair however the best thing is finding a competent mechanic(BMW or MB specific) to work on them bringing costs in better check.


#15

Use the on line Kelley Blue Book web site (www.kbb.com) to see what is available given your constraints on price and mileage.

According to Consumer Reports, Mercedes reliability is terrible. BMW reliability is now average, but was poor in the late '90s to early '00s, which is the model year range in which you are likely to find a car you can afford. Both brands are expensive to fix.

Above all, get a good, independent pre-purchase inspection.


#16

Don’t believe the negativity about a Benz. I have a '99 C230K with 82k miles and THE ONLY THINGS we’ve had to replace/fix are the front brake pads and a ball joint. The previous body style C class (2000? and before) is reliable, safe and cheap to insure. You should be available to find one with similiar miles for less than ten grand.

I also have an '86 BMW 325es that has cost me less than $2000.00 in repairs for seven years. It runs and handles like a new one and gets 25 mpg in the city with the A/C going full blast.

I believe the key to successfully buying (and owning) any used Benz or BMW is to keep looking until you find one that has been taken care of and serviced. You also have to do the necessary scheduled maintenance. Both companies make great engines and transmissions and their cars can easily go 250K miles if taken care of properly.


#17

Edmunds.com is worth a look, too. A 2000 E320 with 75,000 miles would cost about $12,000. A C240 or C280 could be less than $10,000 without many extras. These are all private party sales. Dealer sales would be higher. Be patient and find one in excellent condition. An older person is likely to have taken care of it and it may not have been a commuter car. That would keep the miles low.


#18

I believe the key to successfully buying (and owning) any used Benz or BMW is to keep looking until you find one that has been taken care of and serviced. You also have to do the necessary scheduled maintenance. Both companies make great engines and transmissions and their cars can easily go 250K miles if taken care of properly.

Very true, but they are never going to be popular with the “consumer reports” crowd who are only just interested in the lowest cost per mile, i.e., something that they can just drive into the ground with little or no maintenance (that’s why they make hondas/toyotas/etc.). My '82 benz now has 380K miles and is going strong, I don’t expect to do an engine rebuild for at least another 100K miles (but my total cost per mile is certainly higher than a late model appliance). It’s all about what you want to drive. If you don’t care, just buy the appliance.

I agree that the OP should shop very carefully if he wants to find a good one for $10K. The lower-end cars do tend to be more abused/neglected than the more expensive ones, so you have the potential of buying one that’s in need of several $1000 of “deferred maintenance.” It’s well worth the cost to have a good pre-purchase inspection done.

I just want the OP to know what he’s getting into, if you want to keep one of these car in “like new” condition indefinitely, it will cost some money. The parts are fairly expensive, as is the labor, unless you enjoy playing with them yourself.

Personally, for $10K I would buy a nice late 70s/ early 80s benz or bmw (a friend of mine just sold a very decent 84 benz for about $12K), but you do have to know what you are looking at to avoid being ripped off. Buying a 5-10 year old car is safer, but you still have to be careful (for example, buying one with a bad transmission would be a $4-5000 mistake).

IMHO, it’s really a waste to buy one of these if you’re not going to maintain it properly, there’s no point in paying a premium for a real car if you are not going to preserve it. It will eventually become unreliable and you will not be happy, then (god forbid) you will turn into one of the “consumer reports” clones. In extreme cases you will buy a mini-van, don’t let this happen to you.

Just take your time, don’t rush into anything. Good luck.


#19

I believe the key to successfully buying (and owning) any used Benz or BMW is to keep looking until you find one that has been taken care of and serviced. You also have to do the necessary scheduled maintenance. Both companies make great engines and transmissions and their cars can easily go 250K miles if taken care of properly.

Very true, but they are never going to be popular with the “consumer reports” crowd who are only just interested in the lowest cost per mile, i.e., something that they can just drive into the ground with little or no maintenance (that’s why they make hondas/toyotas/etc.). My '82 benz now has 380K miles and is going strong, I don’t expect to do an engine rebuild for at least another 100K miles (but my total cost per mile is certainly higher than a late model appliance). It’s all about what you want to drive. If you don’t care, just buy the appliance.

I agree that the OP should shop very carefully if he wants to find a good one for $10K. The lower-end cars do tend to be more abused/neglected than the more expensive ones, so you have the potential of buying one that’s in need of several $1000 of “deferred maintenance.” It’s well worth the cost to have a good pre-purchase inspection done.

I just want the OP to know what he’s getting into, if you want to keep one of these car in “like new” condition indefinitely, it will cost some money. The parts are fairly expensive, as is the labor, unless you enjoy playing with them yourself.

Personally, for $10K I would buy a nice late 70s/ early 80s benz or bmw (a friend of mine just sold a very decent 84 benz for about $12K), but you do have to know what you are looking at to avoid being ripped off. Buying a 5-10 year old car is safer, but you still have to be careful (for example, buying one with a bad transmission would be a $4-5000 mistake).

IMHO, it’s really a waste to buy one of these if you’re not going to maintain it properly, there’s no point in paying a premium for a real car if you are not going to preserve it. It will eventually become unreliable and you will not be happy, then (god forbid) you will turn into one of the “consumer reports” clones. In extreme cases you will buy a mini-van, don’t let this happen to you.

Just take your time, don’t rush into anything. Good luck.


#20

Be patient and find one in excellent condition. An older person is likely to have taken care of it and it may not have been a commuter car. That would keep the miles low.

That’s very good advice if you can find one. The challenge is that c-class cars tend to owned by kids, not older folks. I rarely see anyone over 30 driving a c-class, an older e-class might be safer but it’s pretty hard to find a decent one for under about $15 - 20K.