Tranmissions

acura
legend

#1

I HAVE A 88 ACURA LENGEND. I NEED TO REPLACE MY TRANMISSION. WHAT IS THE BEST THING TO DO? I FOUND A USED ONE THAT I PLAN ON GETTING ALSO I’M GOING TO GET THE MANTAINCE THAT IT WILL NEED[FILTER CHANGED,ETC…]. ANY FEEDBACK WILL ACCEPTED. T


#2

A used one that has been rebuilt? Or, a used one pulled from a salvage car? If it is not rebuilt it might not last that long and you’ll find yourself in the same predicament in a few months.

I’d go with a rebuilt tranny if you plan to keep the car for a few more years. If you plan to sell the car as soon as it is fixed then no need to spend more money on rebuilt one.


#3

Please stop shouting (ALL CAPS).

A used transmission is a crap shoot. On a 22 yo car, used parts are also over 20 yrs old. Currently, my record is 50/50 on used transmissions lasting a year. However, for cheap transportation, it is valid, just risky. Personally, I only consider a junkyard transmission on a car I intend to use less than 2 months, and if a good rebuilt is too cost prohibitive.

Maintenance should absolutely include replacing ALL the fluid, including the torque converter. Pull the torque converter out, drain out the old fluid, add some fresh, swish it around, and drain it out as well. Add a quart of fresh before putting the torque converter back on. Remove the pan of the transmission, clean the pan and replace the filter, then reinstall the pan with a new gasket.

Also, I’d advise replacing the case seals, like the front pump seal and the CV joint seals. On a transmission over 20 years old, it would suck to have these start to leak. This is just cheap insurance. And a lot easier to do before installing the transmission.

Additionally, look at the transmission cooler lines. If the rubber is cracked and/or stiff, or the hardline parts kinked up or twisted, consider replacing them now. I’ve fabricated some hardline out of straight tubing, a tube bender, and a flaring tool using the original flared nuts. The flex line, I use the rubber tubing used for auxiliary transmission coolers and double clamp them. These parts are available at any auto parts store.


#4

I’d replace the car…


#5

I have to agree with the others who have posted.

The 21-22 year old used transmission that you plan to get will have essentially the same amount of wear and tear as your transmission that failed. Plus, you have no idea of what type of maintenance it may have had. Most likely it had no maintenance, and no matter what you do in terms of fluid and filter changes, you can’t turn back the clock and erase 21-22 years of wear and tear.

As an old commercial used to say, “Why trade a headache for an upset stomach”?
You need to get a newer car. Any 22 year old used parts are questionable at best.
And, of course, this car’s book value is so low that is not worth the expense of a rebuilt transmission.

Start looking for a newer car.
Sorry for the bad news!