Tire Rotation/Balancing


#1

My tires are roughly a year and half old (no idea how many miles) and I’m wondering if I should get them rotated or balanced. I noticed a significant shake in the car over 70mph about a month ago. I’ve also noticed the shake happening at lower mph (65-70) recently. In general, how often should I rotate or balance my tires and how much should this cost at a shop?


#2

First of all, generally every 7,000 miles you should be rotating your tires. This is easier said than done. The common schedule is every other oil change since the majority of the population should be changing their oil every 3,00 miles.

I would look at the tires and make note of any feathering on the edges or flat spots. For my dime I would rotate the tires first to see if the issue changes or goes away. If you were to have a garage rotate the tires then I might have them also verify balance too. The wheels could have thrown a weight or possibly been damaged due to contact or chord breaking.


#3

You could remove all the balance weights and see if the problem goes away. It does sometimes. Every 6000 miles for rotation worked for my fake SUV from Saturn.


#4

You could remove all the balance weights and see if the problem goes away. It does sometimes.

Huh?


#5

You could remove all the balance weights and see if the problem goes away. It does sometimes.

Say whar???


#6

It does sound like you are due.


#7

Every other oil change usually is a good interval if you want even tread wear.


#8

You have two situations. There is the maintenance action of regular rotation, which some people skip altogether. They simply replace their tires in pairs. This is an acceptable solution.

More important is the front end shake. This is not good. You need to take care of this, and it might not be a simple matter of balance & rotation. A defective tire could be at fault.

My advice is to go to the shop and explain the problem rather than simply request balance & rotation. Let the technicians make their recommendation.


#9

Rotate per schedule in your owner’s manual.

One of more of your tires needs balancing. Some can detect by driving if the problem is the front or rear tires if you want to do the least work possible to be good again.


#10

What kind of vehicle? FWD, RWD or 4WD. I do not rotate on RWD, only once on FWD when the front tires are down to 6/32" tread and every time there is a difference of 2/32" between the front and rear tires on 4WD.

Rotating too frequently can mask problems with the alignment of the wheels. They need to stay in place long enough to develop a wear pattern. If the pattern is not normal, then you can get the alignment corrected.


#11

Do get them balanced though.