Timing belt


#1

I have a 2001 Audi A6 Quattro with 36.000 miles. The dealer service department says that the timing belt is overdue to be replaced since it over 5 years old. They claim that the belt will “dry rot” and fail with age. Are these guys just behind on their summer income or is this a serious issue?


#2

it over 5 years old. They claim that the belt will “dry rot” and fail with age. Are these guys just behind on their summer income or is this a serious issue?

They are correct and may save you some serious engine damage. You probably could make it another year or to, but I would not stretch it. Consider the water pump replacement as well. You don’t want to pay all that labor again in a couple of years when the water pump starts to fail.


#3

The owner’s manual should have a timing belt replacement interval in miles or months, whichever comes first.

The “whichever comes first” part is the important part.


#4

Thanks for your input. I double checked the owner’s manual and the interval is recommended at 105,000 miles and no time limit. When I confronted the service guy about why he said 60,000/5years compared to the owners manual, he said that it was a preventative maintenance suggestion from the dealer.


#5

Thanks for your input. I double checked the owner’s manual and the interval is recommended at 105,000 miles and no time limit. When I confronted the service guy about why he said 60,000/5years compared to the owners manual, he said that it was a preventative maintenance suggestion from the dealer.


#6

Most newer cars suggest checking it at 60k and replacing at 105k. I have never heard of a time limit on this either. Of course, I am no mechanic either. If there was a time limit you would think that the owner’s manual would state that.


#7

Indeed there is a time limit on newer car timing belts.
05 Honda Accord V6 is 7 years or 105k miles.
I will likely go to 10 years as the car will have less than 40k at 7 years.
My risk.


#8

I have never heard of a time limit on this either.

Every car I’ve owned that had a timing belt had a time limit and mileage limit.

Most these days are around 100k miles and 7 years.


#9
I have never heard of a manufacturer recommending "Checking" a timing belt on an interference engine.  The accessory yes, but not the timing belt.

#10

It can become a serious issue if that timing belt snaps and your engine sustains major damage to valves and pistons. As I recall, repairs on Audis tend to be VERY expensive.

If I were you, I would weigh the cost of a timing belt replacement (likely to be in the $400.–600. range) against the expense of internal engine repairs (likely to be in the $1,500.–$2,000. range, or more, since it is an Audi) and the inconvenience of being stranded in an inconvenient location, at an inconvenient time.

IMHO, peace of mind and absence of inconvenience is worth the investment of a few hundred $$, but this is based on my value system, and your value system may differ.


#11

My car is over 105K i speak with my mechanic when the car was about to reach the 100K about changing the timing belt, he told me that in my car is not requiered to do so since the timing belt is design to last the lifetime of the engine he said is made from steel and is not a rubber belt , but reading this topic i have some doubts about that , my car is a toyota echo 2001 so i doubt that a cheap car will come with such types of timing belts.


#12

Is it a timing belt or a timing chain? Timing belts definitely have a replacement schedule. Timing chains normally last considerably longer (more like 2-300K miles), whether that is the “life of the engine” or not depends on the engine.


#13

Yeah i think is a timing chain you are right i didnt know that there is a timing belt and a timing chain thanks for the info


#14

Yeah. How would you “check” a timing belt, short of taking apart the front of the engine? If you’re going that far, you might as well do the whole job (belt, pump, tensioner).


#15

Yeah. How would you “check” a timing belt, short of taking apart the front of the engine? If you’re going that far, you might as well do the whole job (belt, pump, tensioner).

On some cars like my wifes 87 Accord there’s a upper timing belt cover. Two bolts and have access to the timing belt. Many manufacturers have a Check Timing belt interval for cracks or dry-rot.


#16

I don’t know what motor that is, but the Corolla 4 cylinder changed to timing chain some years ago. By definition, a “steel timing belt” is almost certainly known as a timing chain. They normally only need replaced as part of a motor overhaul.


#17

Guys i was afraid of severe engine damage and i contact the dealer in regards of this matter
this was the answer " THIS CAR DOES NOT HAVE A TIMING BELT, IT HAS A TIMING CHAIN. THANKS JEFF
" strange i didnt expect this