The right ride for a Thelma and Louise adventure


#1

On this week’s show, Tom and Ray heard from Lydia in Washington, DC. She’s planning to celebrate the completion of her dissertation with a cross-country road trip inspired by “Thelma and Louise” – minus the killin’, that is. What’s the ride of choice for her cross-country adventure, appearance, and ease of repair-wise? Tom and Ray suggested a nice, big '70’s Chevy Caprice Convertible, complete with 8-track tape player.

What cruising machine would you choose? Let us know what you think!


#2

2002-2005 Ford Thunderbird Convertible


#3

Either a Toyota MR2 or a Miata. Good on gas and less likely to need repairs.


#4

I think that a VW New Beetle convertible might be o.k. I know that the Mazda Miata has a better reliability record, but there is a little more room in the VW convertible.


#5

Toyota Camry Solara convertible. A 2008 SLE will run about $22,000. That certainly covers reliability. The appearance is fine, too, as long as the roof is down. Lydia should test drive one and see how she likes it. BTW, the Solara convertibles were more of a Lexus, and were assembled at a Lexus plant. The interior is beautiful, comfortable, and quiet (if she needs to put the roof up).


#6

You’re missing the Thelma and Louise theme and the fact that she’s a historian immersed in the 1960s.


#7

If you’re driving Route 66, be careful. That road claimed the life of a high school friend in one accident, and fractured my skull in 2 places in another.


#8

Mustang convertible


#9

If you’re driving Route 66, be careful. That road claimed the life of a high school friend in one accident, and fractured my skull in 2 places in another.

Fortunately all the other roads are perfectly safe.


#10

“You’re missing the Thelma and Louise theme and the fact that she’s a historian immersed in the 1960s.”

I didn’t miss it. I focused on the reliability aspect for the trip. The two goals are mutually exclusive.


#11

1970 '71 Ford Torino convertible or 1968 '69 Torino Convertible.
You pay too much of a premium for a GM product without getting any advantage over a Ford. 1968 through 1971 Ford’s generally sell for noticeably less than their GM counterparts. Parts availability is basically the same and any shop than can work on one can work on the other. The Torino from these years is a great and comfortable car and is extremely reasonably priced. Most will have power brakes and power steering and many will have A/C. Torino’s are currently the best bargain in large American Iron from this era.


#12

how about a 1968 mustang fastback, a la Steve McQueen? but i’d have A/C installed. if you’re going for the 60’s then why not mix it up a bit?


#13

Lydia, this is not a car suggestion, but I thought I’d share something you might be interested in, given your combined interests – the America on the move exhibit at the Smithsonian and African American history. With these two interests you may (or should) know about the The Negro Motorist Green Book. The one I’ve seen was published in 1949. It was a travel guide that listed hotels, boarding houses, restaurants, beauty shops, barber shops and various other services that would serve African Americans. It allowed them to at least try to improve their safety while traveling around the country. Amazing that such a guide existed…thought you’d find it interesting: http://www.autolife.umd.umich.edu/Race/R_Casestudy/Negro_motorist_green_bk.htm


#14

Classy.


#15

Did this trip with two old girlfriends from Pittsburgh to Aspen several years ago in a 1993 Chevy conversion van. Awesome. No struggles getting luggage in and out. Back seat folds down for bed so naps occurred. Plenty of room between the front seat for a big cooler (our kitchen) so avoid too many meal stops. Made it up and down Vail Pass in summer heat with no problem. Comfort and reliability, but not great mileage, only about 19 mpg. Do this…once in a lifetime experience. You will hurt from laughing!


#16

You’re missing the Thelma and Louise theme and the fact that she’s a historian immersed in the 1960s.

I didn’t miss it either. Since she is not planning to “go over the edge”, reliability is going to be more important, and gas costs more these days. You don’t have to have an old car to enjoy the old roads.

The first time I drove “cross country” I 40 was only completed in a few areas, so I spend a lot of time on the old routes including Route 66. I was about her age and I did it in a convertible sports car (1961 Fiat Cabriolet). It was an experience but a little more reliability from the car would have been welcome. Having to constantly stop and fix things may add to the excitement, but it detracts from the fun and the experience.


#17

1964 E-Type Jaguar roadster. Enzo Ferrarri called the E-type the most beautiful car ever made and I agree.

The '64 is perfect, because they’d corrected the minor glitches by then (like the tendency of the '61 engine to catch fire and the poor headlight performance due to the covers on the '61).