Stuck carbureator flapper


#1

I have a 1988 Chrysler 5th ave… It recently started dying for no apparent reason. Sometimes it will start right up, other times not. My son in law helped me today get it started. He said it was the flapper but isn’t car savy enough to know what to do. Is there a way for me to fix it. Keep in mind I’m female with limited income.


#2

I’m guessing that you mean the choke butterfly at the top of the carb. First, try spraying it with a ton of carb cleaner (cheap at AutoZone, Pep Boys, etc.). I’d guess that the flapper is sticking. If this does not work (and you don’t know anyone who knows how to/is willing to play with the carb), get it to a good independent mechanic. If the choke is binding intermittently, it should be an easy and inexpensive fix.

p.s. By and large, your average Quick Lube technician won’t know a darned thing about carbs - even something as relatively simple as the choke. do yourself a favor and take it to a good local independent who will be more experienced and more likely to be able to help you.


#3

Searching my memory banks. I can’t believe Chrysler was still using carburators as late as 88, but if so, I think he is talking about the choke plate. If the choke closes after warm up, it can stall or run rich. Could also cause a hard start when warm again. So check to make sure the plate is fully open when warm. If not, there should be some type of adjustment, or also check the choke pull off diaphram if they still use them. It is a vacume motor that is supposed to pull the choke open so if leaky, won’t do it. Also, Chrysler used to use a coin like device to signal temperature back in the 70’s and a bad one caused the same type of problem you describe.


#4

Good advice. And, my 1990 Jeep Wrangler (Chrysler) had an OEM carb in 1990; I just kind of assumed they might have used them in other vehicles. Jeeps are Jeeps, after all, so who knows…

The choke pull-ff could definitely be the problem if the diaphragm is cracked. This is also a pretty cheap fix.


#5

The sooner you graduate into a fuel injected car, the happier you will be. Your car is equipped with a computer controlled “feedback” carburetor that were trouble from day one. Getting one properly repaired today will be quite a challenge. I suspect it’s a Japanese made “instrument”, as is the Mitsubishi engine, all the more reason to upgrade to a modern car…