Should I repair my 1997 Lincoln Continental with 48,000 miles on it or replace it?

lincoln

#1

Should I repair my 1997 Lincoln Continental with 48,000 miles on it or replace it?
We bought this car 2.5 years ago with 27,000 miles on it for $3,500. I put 21K on it in 2.5 years. I only drive it back and forth to work (10 miles a day) with my 2 year old. I love this car. I love that I have no car payments. I put about$1.5 K into it for new tires, a battery issue, tune up,etc about 18 months ago. Otherwise it’s been good to us. I recently got into a fender bender and the auto repair shop says the car is not safe to drive-they have to replace the hood. The estimated costs to repair is $2,500-$3,200. Ugh. Should we replace the car instead? We would have to get a loan and then have car payments. And the cars/suvs’ we are looking at have the same mileage on them. Whereas I could probably pay this $3,200 in two months , which is equal to a year of car payments. My feeling is get the car fixed and if it lasts another year then we made the right decision. I also wanted to mention I am expecting a second child in June so we need to be very safe with all these babies in tow.


#2

I would repair the car because of the low miles. The age is a factor but since you know the vehicle…I would opt for a 2 month payment plan over a 5 (?) year payment plan any day of the week.


#3

Get it fixed and it will last a lot longer than “another year.”


#4

I would repair the car but get a second estimate on the repair. That seems like a lot of money for a front end collision repair, all the parts bolt-on. Call the local used car dealers and ask where they get their body work done.


#5

I would get it fixed. Also, with a loan you need full insurance coverage. That’s even more money out of your pocket monthly.


#6

If all they have to replace is the hood, I think that’s about $50.00 at an auto recycling center around here. Used bumpers and fenders would be cheap as well.

I would guess that if you were to replace the hood, the front bumper, and both front fenders, you could do so for $250.00 or less in used parts. If you are not comfortable doing the work yourself, I would find a shop that will install parts that you bring in.

I can’t see how they could come up with $2,500-$3,200 for just replacing the hood. Even if you buy a brand new hood from the dealer and have it painted to match, that estimate seems quite high.


#7

Economically it makes all sorts of sense to repair it. Where else are you going to get a known good car that you love for $3200 or less?

But I noticed that you always have your 2 year old with you. If your driving environment is relatively inert (remote roads in the Midwest, for example) repairing the car is a great idea. But if your commute is a lot more challenging, like on the Garden State Parkway, for example, you may want to consider the added reliability and modern safety features of a new car. Assuming, of course, that a new car is an option.


#8

They only have to replace the hood, and it’s $3200? Yeah, I agree with others - either they have to do a lot more than that, or they’re seriously overcharging you.


#9

I have to say that I interpreted the total cost as being for the entire repair including the hood rather than for the hood alone. But I also know that $3200 doesn’t buy the amount of body repair that it used to.


#10

Look for a junkyard hood and a body shop that isn’t trying to jack up the repair costs.


#11

@98caddy‌

A few years ago I had to buy a hood for an older Toyota at a pick a part junkyard

It was $60 . . . on 1/2 price weekend

Sheet metal at the bone yards has gotten quite pricey, even if the labor is free


#12

@db4690‌

I must be lucky then - I just looked it up and a hood in my area at a pull your own part junkyard is $45.00 regular price. The fenders are $32.00 each, and the front bumper is $48.00.


#13

@98caddy‌

I live in southern california

Perhaps the prices are high in my area . . . ?