Safety tips


#1

Since it is car related, I thought this might be an interesting discussion.

What car safety tips have you learned that you would like to share ?

When making a left turn from a two highway, do NOT turn steering wheel until you are actually read to turn.

If you are rear ended and steering wheel is turn left, you will be driven into oncoming traffic.


#2

If you are pulling into the right lane of a road with 2 lanes, dont go if there is a person in the left lane, as they could change lanes and hit you. I see this too often, and have had to slam on the brakes because of it.


#3

I had driver’s training back in 1964 and there are still tips I think of every day from that behind the wheel course. Proper turning, parking, and so on and including when the light changes to green, be sure to check whether a car is still barreling through.

I have to say though one of the best in in Army basic training where we were run through some basic defensive driving lessons. They didn’t want to lose their investment until they could be shipped out and shot. At any rate I member the emphasis on keeping that free space all around your car. Front, back, left, right. Takes some work in traffic but it gives you that extra safety margin to avoid accidents. Its still in my mind since 1970.


#4

I agree wholeheartedly with Bing. When I taught people to drive tractor-trailer or school bus I told them the best safety device was a very large cushion of air all around their vehicle. When traveling in bad weather on interstates people feel safety in numbers and travel in packs tof 20-30 cars with large spaces between packs with much flashing of brake lights and lane changing. If you get in the space between packs you can travel along between them relaxed and stress free.


#5

kolby123,

I do not understand what you are saying ?

If there is no one in the right lane, why can’t you move over.

I can see maybe slowing down after you make a lane change.


#6

Speaking of driver training.

Most insurance companies give a discount for 3 years if you take the drivers safety course.

That’s true in Tx, not sure about other states.


#7

Yep, true in Minnesota. I take it every few years from our insurance agent and he has fresh baked chocolate chip cookies and coffee too just to keep us awake. Reminds me of cottonball heads described in one of Lee Child’s Reacher books (the one in South Dakota-61 hours or something like that). I always think they should have the rescue truck waiting outside for the participants.


#8

Always look ahead, waaay ahead. The stuff right in front of the car will not be avoided, the things 100 yards ahead can be avoided. Look left and right and rear, all the time. Know your surroundings at all times. Too many people drive with their attention directly ahead 25 yards. You can see these people when lanes end driving right up to the lane end before they think to look to see if the lane beside is clear.

When merging on the highway, the highway traffic has the right of way, not the merging lane. A huge pet peeve of mine. Combine that with those that don’t look ahead and you’ve got an accident waiting to happen.


#9

I think the state should use a dart system for poor drivers.

It would use those darts with the suction cups. Red in color.

When a driver does a stupid or careless maneuver, you shot a dart at his window.

When there are 10 darts on a window, they get pulled over and given a ticket. :slight_smile:


#10

Not to sound like a jerk, but I stopped reading that guy’s books a long time ago

His first few were very well written, and thoroughly engrossing. Then the quality dropped dramatically, at which point it became very bland. I read a few more, and realized he wasn’t going to improve, so I gave up

His writing style noticeably changed at one point, and I’m wondering if he started hiring ghost writers, or partnering with other authors, as James Patterson does. His books may be bestsellers and easy to read, but they’re quickly forgotten


#11

on roads through town where someone could be in the left lane driving along and someone tries to merge into the right lane from a side street as the person in the left lane is coming up on them, even though they are in different lanes the person on the left could be merging over and hit the person getting on the road. I cant find a picture to show you.


#12

Another reason to be careful passing folks on the right.


#13
  1. Do NOT swing a bit to the right before making left turn (and vv)

  2. Do NOT “cut the curve short” by crossing the line during curves

  3. Turn on your headlights in bad weather conditions. Even if you have daytime driving lights as they do not turn on the rear lights. Slow down and keep to the right in rain or snow. Specially in fog.

  4. Keep your distance (very important). So someone from another lane cuts in front of you… Drop back to maintain the distance from you to the car ahead of you

  5. When merging into a 2 (or more) lane highway, even if your lane is clear, watch for drivers in the other lane(s) as they may decide to switch lanes.

  6. Keep your speed to below the speed limit (or 5 MPH above max).

  7. When you see a red light ahead, or other thing requiring a stop, start slowing down. Stop gradually, not at the last minute.

  8. Drive conservatively. Use turn signals. be cautious. Always be aware what the cars around you are doing.


#14

Do not use a center “left turn lane” for merging or as an island of safety while getting onto the road. Do not drive in this lane. It is there only for people making left turns.

To use it for other than the intended purpose (left turns) is against the law in most (all?) states and hopefully, violators will be ticketed.
CSA


#15

Regarding those center turn lanes, I can recall when they were first initiated on Route 27, in Colonia/Avenel NJ, about 30 years ago. Some of the locals were so…dim…that they couldn’t quite fathom this new-fangled feature, and as a result they stopped in the left travel lane in order to make left turns, rather than using the center turn lane.
:rage:


#16

I think kolby 123 is describing entering from a side street.


#17

Yeah, i tried to find an example but couldnt.


#18

I just discovered kolby 123 already clarified. Never mind.


#19

I still see that quite often nowadays. It’s incredibly dangerous, and extremely frustrating.


#20

…And speaking of dangerous, quite a few years ago when they were repairing the Hudson County extension of the NJ Turnpike (which is only 2 lanes in each direction), the right lane was closed for repairs, and the righthand shoulder was being used as a travel lane. There were signs directing motorists to use the “right” lane in the event of a breakdown, and to use the shoulder as a travel lane.

So, what did I encounter?
I came upon an elderly man with a flat tire, who had decided to park his car on the shoulder, despite the signage. In addition to the fact that he came damn close to causing a few collisions, he wound up totally jamming-up the traffic flow because his actions caused the roadway to become one lane.