Rebuild fuel pump

pontiac
sunfire

#1

i have a 1995 pontiac sunfire and the fuel pump is bad.can i rebuild it or shuold i get a new one?


#2

IIRC the 1995 sunfire is fuel injected and has the pump in the tank. I have never heard of anyone rebuilding these modular pumps. There are no parts (brushes, bearing bushings, armatures, etc.) available to users and most likely the commutator will be badly worn and the armature windings might be open or shorted.

The best approach is to buy a new pump. If you are really strapped for cash, you probably could try one from the bone yard. But, you will pay the same for labor whether you install a new one or a used one so take that into consideration. This can be a DIY job if you can stand working around gasoline and lowering the tank.

Hope that helps.


#3

i know i have to drop the tank just asking some advice from anybody that knows.next question is can i take out the old pump and install a external pump


#4

Yes, you could install an external pump but why bother if you’re going to drop the tank anyway?
An electric motor shop could rebuild it but it would cost far more than the price of a new replacement pump so just buy a new one; and a new fuel filter/tank sock.

The main reason for putting the pumps inside the tank is so the tank and gasoline can be used as a sound deadener. Mount the pump outside and you may have to listen to a faint and/or annoying whine.


#5

Sure, it can be done. I’ve done this on several off road vehicles.

First, you’re going to have to fabricate a new pickup for the tank since the pump will no longer be there. Next, you will have to fabricate a mounting bracket for the new pump and let me tell you, that’s no slam dunk. Why? Because the external pump is going to be LOUD and transmit vibrations through the frame/body. So you need all kinds of isolation provisions to keep your sanity while driving the car.

Also, keep in mind that a quality external pump is going to be considerably more expensive than the in-tank pump it is replacing. Two reasons; one is cooling. Since the external pump does not have the benefit of being immersed in fuel, it has to be built more robust to handle the heat generated. # Two is based on the design. In tank pumps only have to be good at pushing fuel. They are located right at the source of fuel and so suction is not a problem. But your external pump now has to work against the height of the pickup tube and restriction of a much longer intake line. The pump therefore has to be a good at both inlet suction and output pressure and this costs more money.

If you want my opinion, just replace the existing pump with a quality equivalent, make sure the inlet sock and tank are clean, that the wiring to the pump is sound so it isn’t starved for current and don’t run low/out of fuel on a consistent basis and it should last a long time.