Rabbit and Rodent Proof Cars


#1

There is a problem with rabbits in my small housing community and the HOA refuses to take action. Last year, a rabbit chewed the transmission hose in my 2000 Lexus LS 400, leading to the transmission shredding apart upon driving. Now, a rabbit has chewed the wiring harness in my 2002 Toyota Avalon leading me to have to replace the knock sensors to get rid of the codes.



Are rabbits attracted to Toyota products? Which cars do rabbits not seems attracted to?


#2

MOVE!!!

You have 2 MAJOR issues.

Rabbits.
And a BAD HOA.

MOVE!!!

BC.


#3

Try spraying the engine compartment with some type of deer repellent, like coyote urine (yes, you can buy the stuff). Pretty sure rabbits will stay far away from anything that smells like a coyote.

Of course, be sure not to get the spray into the air intakes above the hood.


#4

Agreed. It’s time to move.

The best solutions to the rabbit problem would be a dog; preferably one that likes to hunt.


#5

I’ve tried the spray. It works for two days and then the rabbits are back under the hood:-(


#6

Try using some pepper spray or tabasco sauce rubbed on/around the wires


#7

No idea on the car, but I’m curious - what do you expect the HOA to do?


#8

If you have a problem, it is likely that other residents have the problem, too. You might talk to your immediate neighbors to see if they have the same problem. Have you talked to your car insurer and home insurer? You might get some reimbursement if you haven’t already. Aftr all the talking, you might set up a joint plan to force the vermin away. If you have a dedicated parking spot, putting out scent deterrents (like coyote urine) could work on your own. Soak rags in the stuff and put them near the front of your car when it is parked. If you keep them in sealable plastic bags, the odor won’t be detectable until you lay them out. Just open the top of the bag; the odor will get out. If you share parking spots, you may nee the group to do the same.


#9

Trap them and relocate them…after a while you will get them all.


#10

You also may considering calling a local animal control outfit.

Does the home owner association say why they don’t want to take action? Have you attended the meetings? Are you the only one with problems?


#11

If it’s a rental, that might be easy. Selling a home these days is not easy.


#12

I just read the CC&R’s of my HOA and they are not responsible for anything that happens to vehicles in the common area. The homes are right next to each other and the driveways are about 10 feet apart and it’s a small community where I can see many homes on one street. There are rabbits scurrying about all over the small front yards, common areas, and backyards. No other car has been affected in the neighborhood but mine and the rabbits don’t bother anyone else in the community so the HOA has done nothing about the problem. I park my Subaru Forester right next to my Toyota Avalon and I see rabbits go underneath the Forester, yet nothing has ever happened to the Forester. I spray the engine compartment and the concrete next to the car with a deer repellent spray that smells foul like rotten eggs and it work or a couple days and then the rabbits are back around the car.

I have a feeling they might be attracted to Toyota products for some reason, but if I sell the car, I don’t know what other manufacturers to avoid or buy.


#13

Make a couple large planters, and fill them with herbs and vegetables.
You will have rabbits there, but they will then leave your car alone.

Really, there isn’t anything you can do to prevent rabbits from doing what they are doing to your car, expect put your car somewhere that the rabbits can’t get to. If you have a garage, you NEED to empty it out, and use it for the cars. Put your stuff into a storage unit, if you have to.

BC.


#14

I have never heard of rabbits doing what you describe. Sounds like mice or rats to me.


#15

That I would like to see. How do you catch them all when they breed like … like rabbits?


#16

That reminds me, I took care of a mouse problem with glue traps and rat poison. Unfortunately, glue traps wouldn’t help you, and you would have to find a way to place the poison where neighborhood pets can’t get at it. If you could find a way, though, poison should be effective.


#17

Call the Department of Agriculture Office in your state’s capital. Their service is free (you pay for it out of every pay check) and they have true experts in rhodent control. Perhaps they can make a recommendation.

Rabbits (and other rhodents) chew constantly. Their teeth continue to grow throughout their lives, and if they do not the teeth can actually grow too long and prevent them from eating, and they starve to death. There may be something they’d prefer chewing on that the DOA office will recommend to prevent them from chewing your wires.


#18

There is NO WAY IN HELL you’re having a rabbit problem.
The problem you’re having is called rats/mice.

Rabbits do not chew car parts no matter how hungry or big of a tooth-ache they have !!


#19

Yes, rabbits will do this. Rabbits chew constantly and will chew on almost anything. I had rabbits for years when the kids were young. Many, many, many rabbits.


#20

As someone who had many, many rabbits for years, let me assure you that they will chew just about anything available. Rabbits do not chew because they’re hungry or have a toothache, they chew constantly to prevent their teeth from overgrowing. Rhodents’ teeth continue to grow rapidly througout their lives, and of they don;t continually chew they risk the teeth overgrowing and rendering them unable to eat. Rats will even chew brick if nothing else is available.