Part welded to frame bent in accident :(


#1

Here I have some pictures of a part welded to the frame that was bent in an accident. I am doing most of the repairs myself to save money but I’m a little stumped on how to get this piece back into shape. It hosts the headlight so all the holes in it have to be precise. I went to an auto body shop and their suggestion was to basically tie it up to a tree and yank on it. I feel there has to be a better way. Any suggestions would be helpful!!!

https://plus.google.com/photos/105822062243295156423/albums/6037077464274404145
^^^^^^pictures


#2

Post some picture of the driver’s side so we know what it should look like.


#3

Yah, for lack of a frame machine, that’s about the best idea.
Body shops have a frame machine. A large platform / rack with numerous multi-adjustable anchor points and pull points.
Try to replicate that idea with the tools you have like a come-along, hydraulic jack, fence stretcher, and other lever and prying tools.


#4

close a large adjustable wrench on offending pc of metal and bend as desired


#5

How expensive would it be to replace that part, or pull one at a junk yard?


#6

The extension that attaches to the upper radiator support isn’t very strong. If you can’t bend it back by hand gently pull it back into place with a hand operated cable winch (come-along).


#7

Ask all your friends if they have a “spud bar.” Leverage is your friend.


#8

Tree and ratchet strap look like a good option.


#9

See if there’s a rental place where you can rent a Porta-Power.

Tester


#10

Don’t tie a rope to the tree, use a heavy chain.


#11

That’s the apron that’s bent. Don’t know what make model vehicle you have but sometimes these are made of high strength steel. I also noticed a portion of it extends down onto the rail and is pulled apart with spot welds tore off.
You will have to use your imagination on this. There are some good shade tree ideas posted already.


#12

The car shows often cut the corresponding piece off a junker, cut off the bent part, and weld on the replacement. On complex parts it can be easier and cheaper than trying to reform a mangled part.


#13

Excellent photos, and I commend you for giving us that to work with.
My suggestion is to take careful measurements using the left side, the existing pieces, and photographs, sufficient to identify where in space the key points should be, do the drawings necessary, cut the section out, attempt to correct it in the shop, then weld it back in. Or, if you have a portable angle grinder with a cutting disc, it might be possible to replace the section with a boneyard piece… maybe… most boneyards don’t like to sell pieces of “clips”.

Any attempt to pull it back into shape will also apply equal force to the parts you’re using to pull it against, and you may end up with reference point being pulled out of wampus. You’d then have a bigger problem.

Chop it out, fix it, and weld it back in.


#14

Yeah it would be nice to just weld on a new one but the welding may be tricky. You also might be able to order the part from the dealer. Its hard for me to tell from the pictures but I guess I’d be inclined to brace a 2x4 or something against that fender support piece so you don’t damage it, clamp a long pipe or angle iron on the piece with the pivot on that 2x4, then start to pull it back where its supposed to be. Might have to do some repositioning of the 2x4 and pipe depending on where you have to pull on the piece. Remember its been bent so it work hardened at the bends and will not just pull out. You’ll have hammer out the bends which of course changes the temper in the piece but don’t think that’s critical on that part. Usually you spend 3/4 of the time trying to figure out how to approach it and 1/4 of the time actually doing the work.


#15

The welding would require solid clamping and temporary bracing, combined with tack welding and welding in short lengths to prevent warping, all IAW the dimensional drawing I suggested as part of the process.


#16

I agree with TSM that those are some nice pictures. You did a good job at showing us just what you were dealing with, but I think you missed…in the guidelines…the part about a pretty girl with a short stick…pointing out the offending part. Maybe next time!!!

Yosemite