Oil Viscosity

toyota
camry

#1

What weight oil should i use in a 92 toyota camry with a 4 cylinder where the weather gets to -50


#2

Engine has 170000 miles on it


#3

Im coming up with 0-20


#4

I would go with 0W-30, 0W-20 may be a little too thin when warmed up for this older, looser engine.


#5

Agreed

Thank You

and i went with Mobil 1 synthetic


#6

For those temps…I’d stick with a pure synthetic. But I think ALL 0w is synthetic.

0W-30 is probably the best. And if you have the ability…I’d consider getting a block heater for the nights it gets that cold.


#7

Block & oil pan heater installed

Thanks


#8

5000 miles for a change with synthetic?

I usually just change it when it looks ready


#9
I usually just change it when it looks ready

No way can you tell by the way it looks…IMPOSSIBLE.


#10

What does Toyota recommend for your car? If you don’t have the owners manual anymore, the information is probably on line; maybe at the Toyota site. I know that you can download late model manuals, but I’m not sure when the cutoff is. I wouldn’t be surprised if Toyota recommends 5000 miles for that era car. Also, if you have a block heater, the outside, overnight temperature is not as important as the temperature of the engine block. It might turn out that you could use a higher viscocity mineral oil since the block temperature is never even -40 when you crank the engine. Here are some thoughts on viscocity.

http://www.blackstone-labs.com/oil-viscosity.php

Toyota probably recommended 10W-30 or 5W-30 in 1992. The zero winter recommendations are for improved gas mileage.


#11

I would go to a full synthetic 0W30. The owner’s manual probably says 5W30 mineral oil.

With a good battery and your block heater you should have no trouble starting and the oil will flow quite fast to the valve gear. I agree that 0W20 in such an old vehicle not designed for 0W20 will result in oil consumption.

I’ve used 0W30 for many years, starting with 0W30 Shell Synarctic, a partial synthetic.


#12

Coldfoot, Alaska? Heh, heh.


#13

I spent the night in coldfoot a few days ago. Wiped me feet on the pass and had to throw iron.


#14

No owners manual and i cant seem to find one i dont have to pay for/

Mike
I know we have been here before but i find it real hard to believe that when oil turns brown, Dark brown or black that it doesnt mean its time to be changed. That to me means its dirty …


#15

@badbearing, color of the oil is not always a good indicator. In some cars, oil will darken quickly , but still be good for 5,000 miles. Smelling it for fuel saturation is a better indicator. Sending it off for oil analysis at certain intervals is even better.


#16

Agree with @BustedKnuckles and others. Oil color to the visible eye can’t be used to determine a need to change the oil.

If one’s goal is to have the oil appear cleaner longer, non-detergent oil can do that (but carries other ill effects).


#17

Anyone remember Arco’s graphite oil???

It looked dirty right from the bottle.


#18

Are there any SAE viscosity grades thinner than “0w” ?? Is zero the end of the scale for motor oil? Is there anything “thinner” than 0w-20 weight synthetic oil? Fifty below zero…I think I’d be looking for a new job…Someplace South of Latitude 40…Way south if possible…

Arco Graphite…Yeah, apparently graphite was not the answer…


#19

I remember Arch Graphite. I bought that sales pitch hook-line-and-sink. My father tried to talk me out of it - but I was young and knew everything. Then it came out that the graphite and teflon buildup would lead to clogged oil passages.


#20

In the past I’ve rubbed oil between my fingers to judge condition.
If it feels watery and/or gritty it’s overdue for a change.

One of my brothers had a ratty old van that cranked slow when hot.
Oil felt about as slippery as beer. Oil change fixed the problem.