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Oil filters

Have been using Fram oil filters for over 40 years! Recently bought new Ford Fusion that uses synthetic oil! Is it ok to continue with Fram? Ive been told that Hasting’s filters are better but more expensive & so are the filters purchased from the dealer

There are several oil filter evaluation sites on the internet - just do a google search. I have been using Mobil 1 oil filters on my cars for the last 7 years because they are consistently rated as one of the best. My truck has 168,000 miles and still going strong with these filters and synthetic oil.

Dealer oil change $29.95 ( coupon; filt & 5 qts ), oil filter portion $7.00, Becoming friends with your dealer…priceless.

Not expesive. And, some Auto Zones carry Motorcraft too.

I have had no issues with any oil filter for over 30 years. I used Frams exclusively for nearly 20 years, and do not hesitate to use one today.

As purely a matter of choice and availability from where I buy them, I tend to use Motorcraft and Purolator filters. In your specific case, using the Motorcraft branded filter if it is available at Walmart could be your least expensive choice and you would have the assurance you are in 100% compliance with any Ford filter requirement.

There’s nothing wrong with Fram filters at all no matter what type of oil is used.
The only problem with Fram filters is internet innuendo.

The type of oil makes no difference. Fram filters are fine. They may look cheap and of lesser quality if you cut one apart, but in real day to day use, they are the equal of the expensive brands or OEM from the dealer (that may have been made by Fram.

The filters from the dealer are priced like everything else from a dealer, very very high. Most of their sales are what economist call in-elastic. In other words few buyers do comparative shopping so they can charge anything they want.

Thanks for the info guy’s! I really appreciate it! I guess I’ll compare the motocraft at Walmart since that’s where I get all my Fram filters anyway! Only have Advance auto around here - no auto zone!

I use Motorcraft from Wally World for my two FoMoCo products.

I had to make an educated guess on your engine size, but Advance Auto carries at least four brands of cartridge and spin on filters for your car. You need to confirm which type you have (I check for 4 cyl engine, not 6 cyl).

Price range for cartridge is $6.59 to around $10, depending on brand. All of these are available for pick up same day at the stores in my metro area. Spin on is no issue at all, same brands and more availability. Don’t know what Walmart may have, but any of the filters that Advance Auto has suits your warranty requirements.

I too have been using Fram and now Wally World filters for as long as I can remember…and I’ve owned cars for over 40 years.

I’ve never ever worn out and engine, even after hundreds of thousands of miles. I’m batting 1000. How can any filter possibly improve on that performance?
I’m sticking with Fram and generics.

For 35 years I’ve used fram or purolator, and only change my oil once a year. I use Meijer oil. I’ve seen under my valve covers a couple of times and it’s always very clean.

Never had an oil-related problem.

In my opinion, that change every 3,000 mile advice is a bunch of baloney.

I don’t know about you, but I would not trust a filter made with cardboard endcaps and plastic anti-drainback valve. In my cars.

With modern engines and oils 3,000 miles is long obsolete. Typical manufacturer recommendations are 5,000 to 7,000 with some as high as 10,000.

In the 60s and earlier oil did not stand up as well to heat and shearing forces, and dilution and contamination from blowby were a bigger problem than thay are today. And the rich fuel mixes and in many cases marginal ignition systems were added factors. Engines simply ran dirty. 3,000 miles was prudent.

That stuff is not cardboard, it does look like it however.

While there are plenty of stores about how they are built, and there are a few examples of where they have failed, there has been no evidence that they acturally fail more often or perform less well than any other filter.