New 08 vs 09


#1

I am in the market for a new car and am looking at Toyota Corolla and Matrix. 09s are in now. Is newest always better? There are rebates on 08s but in years to come I will be driving a car that looks dated. Consumer Reports etc info is on the 08’s. Does it follow that the newest model will be as reliable or does it need a couple years to prove itself? They say these Toyotas are redesigned from the ground up, but with the same engine. My last new car was a 94 Corolla so I know Toyotas are reliable. Any thoughts on this would be a appreciated as I will keep this car a long time also. Thanks, Teresa


#2

Everyone has a different experience, but if you are considering a Toyota you should not have to worry about reliability. Toyota has had some glitches over the years but fewer than anyone else. You should purchase the type you want and can afford. I’ll bet you will be happy either way.


#3

I guess what I am asking is - for people who know cars, do they think it’s the same car only updated, or is it all new and later we’ll hear about the problems.


#4

I have notice several new models have been less then stella their first year our…03 4Runner , new Tundra, and new model Camry 6. But less than stella for Toyota is still pretty decent.
Corollas seem to change very little mechanically (added bigger motore they have ben using for years) so I wouldn’t hesitate either.


#5

You cannot tell what the exact risk will be with a redesigned model. It is something you have to determine for yourself. That is why Consumer Reports mentions the redesign. Toyota hasn’t had a loser vehicle since the Cressida, and some people would swear that it was the best car made.


#6

but in years to come I will be driving a car that looks dated.

How long do you plan on keeping this vehicle if you’re worrying about a dated look?


#7

Its a significantly improved car. The old Corolla was long in tooth compared to its more modern peers. I would go with the most current design if you prefer the looks.

I got one as a loaner(well rental) at an indy repair shop. Much more pleasant than the old (prev gen) one. Simply put drive both, you may like the old better.


#8

Either model year will serve you well. If you plan to keep it for a long time (8 or more years) the cost savings is not as important. Unless you get a loan. Drive them both and see if you think that the extra cost is justified. You just might like the newer one $1200 more (difference in LE with rebate).


#9

Almost all cars appear ugly or dated after several years so why worry? Toyota Corollas too, have never had anything other than ordinary styling; not too outstanding or too conservative so as to cause the sensibilities of their targeted market to be offended. Toyota Corollas must appear close to mainstream at the moment. People who buy Toyota Corollas simply want inexpensive wheels and there is nothing wrong about that.

Newer on the average is better if you look at the long view.


#10

IMHO, you are better off buying a late model used car and keeping it slightly fewer years. Let someone else eat the initial depreciation and save some cash (or buy more car for the same money).


#11

Both the 09 Corolla and Matrix are newer and larger, and have powertrains carried over, but a larger engine is also available. As other posters relate, don’t worry about the quality and reliability, but that would only apply to a Toyota or perhaps a Honda. Most manufacturers have new cars with some teething problems, due to insufficient testing.

I would not buy a first year car that had an entirely new engine or transmission.


#12

Toyota and Honda had shorter development cycles and could afford to spend more time testing new designs. I’m not sure if other manufacturers have caught up, but Toyota seems to have had problems with the new Camry.