My rear whines

dodge
ram1500

#1

I own a 2004 Dodge Ram automatic transmission with tow package. I use the truck fro getting around and moving light loads from here to there, nothing heavy. About two months ago I started to notice a whining sound coming from the rear. I did not pay too much attention to it at first, but it has gotten louder lately. It is most prevalent at speeds above 35 mph. I have tires that are 1 year old and the transmission is two years old. Mechanics have told me the truck is fine but I am concerned! Should I seek a second opinion or am I just being an overprotective of my truck>


#2

Have you serviced the rear diff fluid?

Tester


#3

No. I’ll give it a try


#4

I was tempted to recommend that you see a Proctologist, but that would be inappropriate. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

In all seriousness, has anyone checked the level of the oil in the differential?
When–if ever–was the differential lube changed?


#5

First off, I figured you’s go there with my title Whining rear!

As for the fluid, not since I bought the truck at an auction in 2013 at least. I speculate that it has not been checked since the transmission was in bad shape as well when I purchased the truck. It’s been a good truck. This noise is a relatively new phenomenon


#6

Outside of transmissions, rear ends must be the most neglected part on the car. Proctologists earn every dollar they make, no?


#7

Not on my car.


#8

LOL. DO suggest that I have the fluid replaced in the differential?


#9

Change the fluid (it isn’t hard on most trucks) and you may be AMAZED at the MUD that comes out of the rear end. You usually have to take the plate off these as many have a fill plug but no drain plug. This is just as well so you can look around at what is inside. I had a used Jeep that had been run hard and not taken care of. I changed the diffs just to do it (no symptoms) and literally had mud in the front diff. I had to scoop out what I could and then refilled with the cheapest store brand fluid I could find. I ran it a short time and then changed again. It looked bad as expected so I did this again. It still looked bad but I figured it was better than before so refilled with what I wanted to use from the start and left it that way until I sold it with that fluid. The axles themselves are filled with fluid as well so am sure that was very full of mud that continued to work out into the fresh fluid.

You may get lucky and have no further problems or might need to eventually get a new or rebuilt diff. I know people who have developed a leak, heard noise, fixed leak, refilled, and had no further issues. The gears in these are really tough but you want to check the fluid ASAP before damage does occur.


#10

Definitely change the fluid, and if it has a limited-slip (Antispin, in Mopar-speak), be sure the proper friction modifier additive is added. However, once they start whining, they generally don’t completely stop without an overhaul.


#11

It’s been my experience that Chrysler products need a very large storage capacity in order to store at least one spare automatic transmission. They should come from the factory that way. Eliminate the spare tire and replace it with a spare transmission. Then 10 miles after the warranty runs out, when the transmission fails, you’ll have the repair bill for labor, but at least you’ve got an extra transmission that’s already paid for.


#12

You beat me to a smart a** reply. Mine was: So does my Grandson but that’s an easy duct tape repair.


#13

Since we’ve already gon there -

Did you heard about the proctologist who wants to become a mechanic?

On his final exam he got a 150 out of 100.

When he asked the teacher how he could get 150 out of 100 - his teacher replied.

. You got 50 points for rebuilding the engine.
. Another 50 points because the engine actually ran after you rebuilt it.
. Then you were awarded 50 bonus points for doing everything through the muffler.


#14

[quote=“davidpsr, post:11, topic:95589, full:true”]
It’s been my experience that Chrysler products need a very large storage capacity in order to store at least one spare automatic transmission. They should come from the factory that way. Eliminate the spare tire and replace it with a spare transmission. Then 10 miles after the warranty runs out, when the transmission fails, you’ll have the repair bill for labor, but at least you’ve got an extra transmission that’s already paid for.
[/quote]And this has exactly what to do with the OP’s issue?

I’ve owned 8 Chrysler products, model years '87 to '07, and the only ones that had transmission problems were minivans (2) whose previous owners had incorrect transmission fluid in them. Except for my '05 Pacifica, all had over 100K miles when I got them.


#15

You may even want to pop the cap and look at the wear patterns. I’ve attached an example, but you may want to do more research.