Is it hard on a clutch to start at minimum RPM?


#1

Where I work doing Valet parking, we frequently have to start from a standstill on a ramp in a parking garage, when parking or pulling something with a standard transmission. Sometimes I will give it not quite enough gas and hear a little bit of “chattering” at 200-300 RPM when moving up the hill, but at the same time I don’t want to give it excessive gas and burn the thing up.



Which is more harmful. Minimal RPMs or extra RPMs ?



Thanks.


#2

Use the minimum RPM that you can WITHOUT lugging the engine! Practice makes perfect…

Advanced technique: Use “heel & toe” to maintain perfect control of the car…Heel on the brake to prevent rolling backward, toe on the throttle to control forward movement…Or use the e-brake (hand brake) if possible.


#3

The problem, as you know, is that every car is different. Some powerful V8’s need very few rpms to take the ramp, small 4-bangers will stall before you even move. Also, the clutch engage position differs. You never know. I’d give 'em all a few extra rpms to avoid looking foolish by stalling. Come down on the clutch pedal quickly if you find yourself roaring forward in a supercharged bomb.


#4

Well, you’ve got the worst, most difficult combination of circumstances - starting uphill with a wide variety of unfamilliar cars. I’d bet 99 people out of 100 couldn’t handle it. Like the others said, it depends, but a little extra gas won’t hurt. You don’t want to rev it up to, say 4000 rpm, though.


#5

The extra RPM’s will wear the clutch more, but if you’re just parking it for one night you’re not going to reduce the clutch life in any meaningful way.

I can’t imagine letting someone valet park a manual transmission car in this day and age! Manual transmission driving is a lost art amongst most young people these days and I definitely wouldn’t want someone practicing with my car.


#6

Most people give it too much gas when starting from a standstill it seems like. Also downshift improperly ( fail to increase engine RPM before engaging lower gear) I was taught that a skillful standard driver will sound like the car has an automatic when starting from a standstill. I am only 21 but was taught properly and did my HW before I got my own car.


#7

you should be revving the engine to between 1500rpm and 2000rpm and bring the clutch up for a nice smooth start,you wont burn the clutch out unless youre doing 5000rpm and bringing it up really slowly!!trust me,here in england about 8 out of 10 cars are manual,and ive been driving manuals(i mean stick shifts!!!)for 20 years and never burnt a clutch out.you could always rev it to 5000rpm and take your foot off the clutch quickly for some great burnouts!!but seriously,its better to rev it slightly higher,than too little.hope this helps!


#8

Neither is good. What is a little better then putting too much burden on either the clutch or the engine is just slightly pumping the gas peddle…not enough to make people turn their heads, but enough to make it neither under or over clutching. The possible damage you might cause one of these cars you work with is pretty small compared to mistakes the common driver makes.