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I need to buy a car

So 8 years ago I bought a 2011 Chevy (Daewoo) Aveo. It has been in one accident. It has no rust. My hubby has done most of the repairs. Engine started to burn the oil. It is at a shop pending hydrocarbon, leakdown and compression test as my coolant was brown with oil. I have read the reviews on here. I have 150k with the original manual transmission. The thoughts seem to indicate Chuck it. I have two kids I need a car to get me back and forth to work 30 miles away I need opinions on what is considered a good used vehicle that is (fairly) easy for a diy to fix, and that isn’t highly technical. I would prefer hand crank windows and manual doors and a stick shift. Less thinks to fix. Thanks!

The 2009-2013 Toyota Corolla L were available with manual windows and stick shift.They are highly dependable cars that you can find for under $ 8000 if you look around.

https://ca.cargurus.com/Cars/lp/search-Toyota-Corolla-manual-sc2_d295?isEntityHint=true&makeHint=Toyota&modelHint=Corolla#listing=182795030

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Ironically my husband found a 2013 Toyota Corolla but it’s power everything and automatic. For 8.5 I want manual everything because I have a fear of being locked/trapped underwater. I was also contemplating putting a Toyota engine in the Aveo, but that’s more money than I want to spend on a car.

Forget that idea, too expensive and might not even fit. Once you have the convenience of automatic transmission and power windows and locks with kids you will wonder why it took you so long.

Give up on your desire for manual everything. You won’t find one. No one buys them that way anymore, no dealers stock them anymore.

Just for the record, you won’t be trapped, electrics work under water.

As for DIY, I DIY most everything on my electronically controlled, automatic trans, power everything cars. Can read and reset error codes for most any system in my cars with readily available smartphone apps. DIY is very relative. If you learn what you need to work on modern cars, you can DIY most repairs.

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Mustangman’s got it right! 90% of what people worry about never happens and this is a good example. Get an automatic with some convenience features and you’ll enjoy it. It shouldn’t cause problems for your DIY hubby.

CSA
:palm_tree::sunglasses::palm_tree:

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+1 to @Mustangman. You have a better chance of winning the power ball than getting trapped under water. In the unlikely event your gps tells you to drive off a bridge, your power windows will still work. Check out Mythbusters. https://mythresults.com/episode72 .

A Corolla esp a 2013 should be in good enough shape to give you years of reliable service. Have a mechanic check it over before you buy it, best $100 you will ever spend. I had a 2008- I gave to my son, very low maint cost spark plugs, one coil, tires and oil, gas and wiper blades, I now have a 2015, same low maint.

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Sure! There is a nice Musclecar Museum in Punta Gorda with a built-in diner on 41 if interested. Its been a few years since I visited.

Forget the used vehicle. You drove the Aveo as far it is might go . There are a lot of new vehicles on the market for under 20000.00 and with full warranty and low interest rates why take a chance on a used vehicle that might just have problems . For instance , here in the Midwest US you can buy new Toyota Yaris for 18000.00 plus we bought a Ford Fiesta that had a sticker price of 17300.00 .
Just go to every vehicle web site and see what they have.

2011? sounds like a headgasket. cheap fix vs new car

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Headgasket or oil cooler leak. Either way I don’t have that much money to spend. My other half and I are trading off the kids to save on child care as is. So unless Santa has a new car in his bag of goodies this year, I am going to have to go with used.

Since 1988, I have owned 4 Ford products, two GM products, and three Toyota products with power windows. I have never had a power window fail to operate. All but the 1988 Taurus had power door locks and these never gave a problem. The two Toyota Siennas I have owned have power sliding doors. I really like this feature and they have never had that first problem.

mechanic said motor is shot because coolant leaked into oil and motor is wasted?
ok, a used motor is kinda pricey
and a running used car might cost the same as a used motor?
lots of used cars for sale. good luck

I want a car I can trust not to leave me stranded in a rural area. The car needs 4 new tires, shocks, struts, water pump, timing belt is due, outer tie rods, it will likely need a transmission or clutch soon. But in reading threads on the CT forum, this car is junk and not worth repairing.

Since you emphasize reliability, the information in consumer reports could be very useful. They have survey data on the reliability of car models back quite a few years. The best way to access this is their website at https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/index.htm
You will have to pay to join, but the cost should be small compared with what
you will put into a car. Unless you have lots of cash, I would not recommend a new car.
Many people think a used car about 3 years old is the best deal.

I have been eyeballing a Corolla, Honda Civic, or Honda Accord due to the amount of gas that I use.

ah, u want a low monthly payment. Don’t want to pay 1k to fix ur car.
Rent-a center. Here I cone

So, I would search for a 2016 or so car with low mileage. The Hondas show up on
CR as lower
reliability than the Toyotas. Have you also considered a Camry.
The 4 cyl versions have very good gas mileage.

@Meg_Duggan. You are thinking in the right direction with the Corolla and Civic in my opinion.
Back in the early 1960s, a mechanic advised me when I was buying a car to get me to graduate school to stick with Ford or Chevy. If he were alive today, his recommendation would be to go with Toyota or Honda.
As far as automatic transmissions are concerned, from the late 1950s on, the three speed column shift manuals became problematic. Many mechanics advised going with an automatic. My last manual shift was my 1965 Rambler Classic. It was not a smooth shifting transmission. I’ve gone with automatic transmissions since that time and have been satisfied.

A four or five year old car should have a lot of life left in it. The most important thing is condition, and four years is enough time to ruin any car with poor maintenance.