Hybrids with V6? Can they get up to 40+ MPG?


#1

We may want to get a V6 to tow our little trailer, but we are very committed to keeping our mileage super efficient.

Any thoughts on the newer oprions coming out…seems dumb to get a big heavy hybrid and not get mileage above 25 MPG.

thanks for thoughts…


#2

Honda used to make an Accord hybrid (they won’t be making any for 2008), but it was more of a performance hybrid - the electric engine added low speed acceleration, and the gas engine never turned off.

You do, however, have a lot of options. Most, if not all, midsize sedans can be equipped with a V6, and would be able to tow some weight - probably not much more that 1000-2000 pounds, but it might be enough… you didn’t say how much you were going to tow. And these sedans will get up to 33 to 35 mpg on the highway. Of course, you won’t get that while trailering, but a hybrid wouldn’t get much better than a ‘normal’ car anyway while trailering.

Also, I have noticed some people driving Chevy Cavaliers and Pontiac Sunfires with trailer hitches on them. That could be another option.

Lastly, there appears to be a number of new diesel powered vehicles coming to market fairly soon. A small diesel car would be a perfect choice - decent mileage, and plenty of towing power.


#3

The number of cylinders is more-or-less irrelevant when talking about a hybrid. The general idea with a hybrid is that it augments the power train, enabling a car to perform better with a smaller engine.

Are you looking for a fuel efficient daily driver that can also tow a trailer, or are you looking for something that will get good gas mileage WHILE towing a trailer? If the former, and you do mostly city driving when you’re not vacationing, you’ll be fine with a hybrid-- I believe any of them except the Insight should be able to tow a small trailer with no problem.

If you’re looking to use the vehicle primarily for road-tripping, a hybrid would be ill-suited because they get far worse gas mileage on the highway than in town. You would be paying the premium for the system, but not getting the benefits of it.

A car with a smaller diesel engine would be ideal for your situation, but unfortunately there aren’t really any ones sold in this country right now that I can really recommend.


#4

What type of driving do you do? Hybrids are best around touwn, though they can get great highway mileage. The Prius is a good example.

As for towing, you need to make sure that the car body can handle it. How much does your trailer weigh? The manufacturer can tell you if you can tow with any vehicle they sell.


#5

Ignore all the hybrid hype and find the best (and most efficient) vehicle that meets your needs. You are not like likely to get 40 mpg while towing anything, but you may be able to find an appropriate vehicle for towing that gets reasonable mileage the rest of the time.


#6

Hey guys and maybe gals? Thanks so much. I was indeed somewhat unclear on the hybrid concept. Sounds like we should shop for what would work for us, and just check w/ dealers about could they tow (I think it is about 1000#).
We try to bike in town, and the car would be for longer trips (mostly)(and freezing weather).
I’ll check into the options y’all presented, thanks again!
L


#7

Check fueleconomy.gov. They tell you what the new EPA mileage is, and there is a place for people to report their own mileage. If it is mostly highway, any small, 4-cylinder SUV will be fine. Still, they rate the Escape hybrid best in highway mileage (29) vs. the Jeep Compass and Patriot (27). But the Escape has an automatic transmission and the Jeeps are manual. The Escape does get an estimated 30 MPG in the city, though.