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How Much ATF in 2005 Camry LE

I have a 2005 Toyota Camry LE. I drained the transmission. I followed the official Service Manual of adding 3.7 US quarts into the transmission after the drain. This put me a bit higher than the cold line, after my transmission was cold. Same thing for hot. I check the level when it’s hot and it’s a good amount over the full line. This is an automatic transmission with a dip stick. I thought maybe the official service manual was wrong and I overfilled my transmission! I checked my Chilton Book and it also suggests for the four cylinder engine (which I have) all except 2004 (which I don’t have) to add 3.7 qts

“Transaxle
Automatic
Four-cylinder engine
All except 2004 (drain and refill) 3.7 qts.”

So I was thinking possibly that 3.7 quarts was the entire capacity of the whole transmission and not the amount that you add after a drain (some fluid remains after a drain). I know for a fact that I didn’t anywhere close to 3.7 quarts. In fact I thought I had under filled it.

So I guess my question is what should I do? Ignore the official service manual and Haynes book that says the same thing 3.7 quarts, and drain some of it out, and trust the amount that appears on my dipstick instead? Or should I just continue driving knowing that I put about 3.7 quarts into the transmission (if not even less) despite the dip stick telling me that I’m over by a good amount.

Go with the dipstick reading.

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The most you can drain from a modern automobile transmission is 40 to 50 percent of capacity because they all eliminated the drain plugs from the torque converters in the late 50s or early 60s. Those books and charts only give you a rough estimate of the fluid that will drain. Remove the excess fluid, transmissions don’t like too much fluid.

So I drained some and thought I overdrained it. So I added a little bit more in. I can’t tell is this way WAY overfilled or just about right? I notice that the film breaks and gets weak and only sticks to the side of the dipstick just right under full. Does this mean I’m good? There’s film much higher than the full mark, but I think this is residue film in the tube I’m picking up hence the film is only on the sides?

There are two notches on the dipstick just to the left of the center pf the photo. I believe the one on the right is for when the transmission is cold and the one on the left is for when the transmission is hot (driven at least 8 miles). From the photo I can’t see where the fluid is on the stick.

I can’t see the level either. In my late 2005 Camry LE, the refill amount did vary a bit. Esp once when I put an aftermarket filter/screen in. So as mentioned, go with the dipstick. The top level, which is the hot level is the one that is better. Drive around a bit, shift through all gears, let the car idle and check the level. Ignore the partial thin smear of the fluid, you want to see the thick fluid on the dipstick, that is where the level is.

What happened to your Camry?

I sold it with 185K miles on it. Nothing wrong with it when I sold it.Had put new struts all around. The steering rack was seeping a bit. I got tired of the car, the brakes were meh from day one. I also need reliable transportation for my job, so that played into it too.
The dreaded head cylinder leak never happened to me.
I had bought it used/CPO with 35K miles. Did front brakes, struts and a few brake light bulbs. Otherwise no issues.