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Headrest

I have a 2004 Hyundai Accent. I pulled out the headrest on the back of the driver’s seat because it obstructed my view when I backed up the car (pulling out of a parking spot, etc.). Does anyone else have that problem when backing up the car? Thank you. abx

This is what mirrors are for. Practice with them to get the feel for what you see in them.

The head rest is is an integral safety item, necessary to avoid neck and back injuries. Unless you sit low enough in your seat that your head touches the seat back, put the headrest back on and learn to adapt.

I agree with Ken that this is truely a critical safety item.

It’s not expensive to have a rear-view camera installed. They make them now for cars. They come with a small screen that’ll show you a video of what’s in back of you.

Does anyone else have that problem when backing up the car?

Not since I had that job parking cars in a garage. We had to always back in. It is safer. When backing in you know where the cars are, when backing out of a parking place you can’t see as well and what you are looking out for is moving. Also because the car maneuvers from the front it is mechanically easier to back into a tight spot (once you learn how) than to turn in. Really.

Please be aware that you’re risking a really serious case of whiplash if you get rear-ended. Can you find some other solution?

To ken green: Most good driving books and driving instructors say that when you back up you should turn your head. They say that will give you a better view of the road. abx

To ken green: Also, when you take the driving test in order to get a driver’s license you will lose points if you don’t turn your head when backing up. abx

Funny thing, I have a rotator cuff issue so turning my head is a bit of a problem, but I never have a problem with the head rest. No matter which way I turn, I am looking around the head rest. I have driven a lot of cars and never had a problem.

With respect, with today’s bucket seats and headrests being the norm, turning around is no longer realistic. In the old days of upright seating and bench seats with no headrests we could put an arm up on the back of the seat and twist too look back, but that’s not possible in modern cars.

Unfortunately, the almighty put facet joints in our vertebra to keep us from twisting our spines too much (the cervical region is that section in your neck) and put our eyes in front of our heads instead of on the sides, so realistically we need to use visual aids like mirrors or cameras.

I still like the rear view camera idea. Joseph’s idea of always backing in is the one I use. I also have convex “fisheye” mirrors in the corners of my flag mirrors and find them a huge help.

The head restraints are a significant part of your car’s safety equipment, hence the correct term–head restraints–rather than head rests.

Are they an inconvenience? Yes. So is severe neck and spinal pain from whiplash-related injuries.

In a similar fashion, seat belts (passenger restraints) will wrinkle your clothing, but most people would consider this inconvenience to be a small price to pay for protection from severe bodily injury. In a similar fashion, head restraints also may produce some inconveniences, but in balance, the advantages greatly outweigh the inconveniences.

I would suggest that you replace the head restraint on your seat.

I Agree With Joseph E Meehan, Toatally.

He says, “No matter which way I turn, I am looking around the head rest. I have driven a lot of cars and never had a problem.”. I Always look behind when backing up and use both side mirrors, too.

He also says, “When backing in you know where the cars are, when backing out of a parking place you can’t see as well and what you are looking out for is moving. Also because the car maneuvers from the front it is mechanically easier to back into a tight spot (once you learn how) than to turn in. Really.” Right on. I always back into parking spaces, even my driveway and garage.

I will add two more reasons why backing in makes sense. The first is questionable, but during my college student days I drove cars that could have required a “jump start” once in a while.

The second reason makes sense, really. I have the potential for iced or frosted windows or fogged windows during several months of the year. Although I religiously
clean all windows and mirrors, I find it more beneficial to be looking ahead when pulling out in inclement weather (for the reasons given by Joseph and because even scraping sometimes won’t completely clear the windows and mirrors and that’s where the wipers are!).

Additionally, I have more visibility arriving at my intended parking destination with all windows having been heated and cleared and the side mirror heat has had time to do its thing.

I’m with Joseph on “backing in”. Funny thing, I’ve got neighbors who have observed us backing into our curving (right and left) driveway and now many of them back into their homes.

To Abfunex: Put the headrest back and learn to look around them before you get hurt.

CSA