U.S. requires new cars to have backup cameras


#1

I have to say I’m torn on this. On one hand, I’ve gotten by just fine without one. On the other hand, I am sure they save lives.

Here is the article: http://money.cnn.com/2014/03/31/autos/rear-facing-cameras/index.html?hpt=hp_t2


#2

Unfortunately, there have been instances where parents have backed up over their own kids


#3

Just more babysitting technology that…when it malfunctions…will cause mass hysteria in all those thousands of newer drivers who never really learned how to do it the old fashioned way…and every resulting problem from that will ALL be the fault of the malfunctioning ‘‘required’’ technology…not the fault of the untrained driver !!


#4

ken

Those backup cameras are just an aid

The main thing is being a safe driver

ABS, backup cameras, stability control, are just there to help you. They’re not supposed to be a substitute for sensible driving.


#5

I actually don’t think its a bad idea and really doesn’t cost much. But what is not really said is that it is the design of the cars that makes it necessary. You just can’t see out the back anymore like you used to be able to. The near rear visibility is really bad due to the high rear windows, head rests that you can’t see through, etc. On my G6, I can’t even see my trailer to be able to back it up anymore like I could with my Rivieras. So i have to devise guide ons just to back it.

The other problem I’ve had with the camera though is that it drives me nuts to back up by looking at the screen instead of looking back where I’m going. So its look at the screen, look back, look at the screen, look back, and not really trusting either one.


#6

@db4690: and in each and every instance thereof, the negligent parent is at fault. Really, how hard is a walkaround? If a trucker can back up 50’ of trailer without a camera, can’t Soccer Suzie backup her Escape? (Maybe I’m grumpy from sitting through yet another stomach-turning anti-smoking propaganda commerical I was forced to pay my taxes on.)


#7

I wonder if they will be required on the back of tractor trailers. You see a lot less when you’re backing up a 53’ trailer than when you back up a common car or SUV.


#8

@meanjoe75fan‌

Of course, the parents were at fault

That said, if I had one of those SUVs with limited rear visibility, I’d rather have a backup camera than not have one

I have a “funny” story here

My sister-in-law has an SUV with a backup camera.

In spite of that, she still managed to back up into her other car, which was parked across the street from her driveway. She t-boned it. Yeah, she nailed it, but good.

Everbody was really grateful that she “merely” hit her own car, versus a person, somebody’s dog, etc.


#9

With so many new cars and SUV’s so hard to see out the back I like the backup cameras. I just drove a pickup with one that was aftermarket and it worked just fine. The goofy lady on the next street from us gets in her Suburban, starts it, puts it reverse then opens the garage door and backs out. Last month she actually backed into her roll around trash can.


#10

@meanjoe75fan, I thought those anti-smoking ads were funded by the tobacco companies, not taxpayers. Nonetheless, the new ones are pretty effective, and from a public health standpoint, don’t they save more money than they cost?


#11

When my mother bought a motorhome, I insisted she get a backup camera installed (along with a third brake light installed on the trailer hitch). With her minivan, I can open the back hatch if I want to see where I am backing up, but you can’t do that with a motorhome or a windowless van. Those should have had mandated backup cameras a long time ago.


#12

I too have mixed feelings. Perhaps this one will be a lifesaver. When I think of the number of times I’ve seen young moms in a rush to get home after shopping throw their little ones in their minivans and come tearing out of their parking space, the number of times I’ve seen people almost get backed over, the number of times I myself have come close to being knocked over, I’m inclined to support this one.


#13

At least I can hope my elected state representatives have the good sense NOT to mandate motorists pay to maintain these things, like TPMS and ABS…those can just be “Christmas-tree lights” as far as PA inspection is concerned.


#14

db ;
aids…yes, WE know that, we’re ‘‘car guys’’.
But these days…WAAAAAAY to many people honestly believe…honestly believe…the tech is God’s word and they needn’t learn the skills for themselves.
THAT is the overall problem I see coming.


#15

I can tell you that I REALLY like the one on my Outback.
When the saleswoman said that it allowed you to see what is beneath your rear bumper, I was skeptical, but–sure enough–the wide angle lens, coupled with the placement of the camera actually allows me to see not just what is behind me, but also what is truly out of sight underneath the bumper.

This actually saved me from a particularly bone-headed move last summer.
I had failed to buy something vital for a yard project, and I jumped into the car in order to hurry over to Lowe’s to buy it. Since I had not properly stowed my rake before getting into the car, and since it had fallen behind the car, the backup camera prevented me from puncturing a rear tire. Just imagine if one of my neighbor’s little kids had been playing hide & seek under the bumper?

Since the screen has distance markings, it even helps me a lot when I have to parallel park.
My most frequent use of this device is in parking lots. I like to pull forward into parking spaces so that I can drive straight out when I am done shopping. The backup camera allows me to place my rear bumper precisely on the line separating my space from the one in back of it.


#16

Reliance upon technology as a crutch for poor fundamental skills is a bad idea. Eventually skills erode from lack of use, the crutch breaks for whatever reason, and the atrophied skill manifests itself as bent metal.

////I think that’s already happened with Stability Control. With the phase-out of RWD, and the phase-in of ABS, fewer motorists were concerned about skids and oversteer, and skills atrophied. Then, unskilled motorists are incapable of handling the contra-intuitive actions required in oversteer loss-of-control, and you get tire stores that refuse to rotate your tires (on the presumption you’re skilless). That wouldn’t have really been an issue in '74…it is in '14.


#17

We have a back-up monitor in our 2003 Silhouette. It senses nearby objects behind and provides an audible and visible (lights) indication of how close you are. I find it useful. No one has to get out of the van and we can get within a foot of something behind us. It isn’t perfect and provides false alarms. But since using this I have been open to the back-up cameras.


#18

I’m ambivalent about mandating more and more safety features with diminishing returns. But the good news is that when all new cars have these, the cost will go way down due to the volume of production.

I suspect that once these become widespread on new cars, most people will find them indispensable.


#19

A couple of you guys are really out of line here. Good parents have backed over kids. People who aren’t even parents have backed over kids. People who have gone around the back of their car before getting in have backed over kids. Kids can move surprisingly fast sometimes.

Backup cameras give you a view that is not available any other way, so saying back up cameras are just a crutch for poor fundamental skills is really not a very well thought out statement. Since when is being able to see through a solid object or around corners a fundamental skill?

They won’t be mandatory until 2018. right now, to get one, you have to buy every other option available for the car, so a $100 camera and monitor ends up costing anywhere from $8k to $10k. It should be required to be a stand alone option right now.


#20

Well its like this,When I park,I try to back in were I have an idea of whats going on(most Firetrucks do this also) but that being said,these cameras would prevent a lot of bent sheetmetal and serious accidents,were something is below the line of sight,people can be very forgetful(this is off topic a little bit-but I despise those comedy gags where baby carriers are placed on top the the car and the Parent" accidently" drives off,not funny at all-Kevin