Expected Lifespan of a car with a low km transmission?

maintenance
pontiac

#1

I am having my transmission replaced on my '09 Pontiac G5 for a reasonable price, with one that has low KM’s and has been fully serviced (filters, fluids, etc…) and was just wondering how long I can expect the car to last after this ? How long should the ‘engine’ of the car theoretically last ?
The engine currently has close to 180,000 KM’s (111,846 Miles) . I have replaced the shocks and struts, fuel lines, and the body is in good condition (may need rocker panels in the future) I have heard it should last ALOT longer with a new transmission, is this correct ?
thanks


#2

The transmission will not extend the life of the engine. So the life of the engine depends on past history, and just chance. No one knows.

Is there any rust aside from the rocker panels?


#3

I sprayed the rockers with this stuff , but aside from a small thumb size hole in the rockers there was just surface rust under the car. I Attached a picture of the rockers after i painted them


#4

This is like predicting the stock market.

It is anybody’s guess. And also what do we mean by “last”, if you keep throwing money and parts at it it might last to a million miles, the question is where do you draw the line.

You already paid for the transmission, hopefully it has some sort of a warranty. Drive and maintain the car but don’t get too carried away when spending on repairs, keep a log and see at what point buying a new car makes more sense.


#5

How long is a piece of string??

As mentioned, unless you know the complete history of the engine and you are a careful and predictable driver, we just can’t give you any solid advice.

I once bought a car from a lady driver who was a friend of my wife. The car was bought new and had 70,000 miles on it. It was well maintained with all the records. We drove it for 9 years and finally sold it for half what we paid for it. The engine was still in near new condition, as was the transmission. During the 9 years I replaced the battery, alternator, starter, intake manifold gasket (GM V8), water pump, and did one brake job.

With good care and sane driving, powertrains can go 250,000 miles easily without internal work.


#6

I dunno. I have 119,000 miles on my Pontiac. I just did an oil analysis on it for the heck of it and seems there is virtually no issues with wear or anything else. I change oil every 3000 or 50% OLM. All I’ve done with the trans is fluid and filter changes with full synthetic every 30,000 and there are no problems. My Buick had 530,000 on it with the original engine that had never been opened and didn’t use any oil. I had the transmission overhauled at 300,000 just as a precaution and the guy said it wasn’t that bad at all. I guess it just depends on maintenance and the type of driving done.

I’m not clear on where you sprayed that undercoat but I’m not a fan of the ruberized coatings since they can crack and cause moisture and salt to be trapped. Too late now. You’d never get it off. There is a product called Rocker Schultz that is used on lower fenders prone to sandblasting. It is sprayed on and painted over and is a little less prone to deterioration than the rubberized stuff. I did use Por-15 on the underside of the rockers where the jack points are to try and protect that area.


#7

Just keep up the maintenance on the entire vehicle and keep your fingers crossed. That’s the best you can do.


#8

An 09 with 110 K miles, if the routine maintenance has been kept up to date and the car driven conservatively, both the engine and the car should have a lot more life left in it. I’d expect to get to at least 200K before needing any major engine repairs. Your comment about needing new rocker panels suggests you may have a rust problem though, and rust is very expensive to fix if it starts to compromise the structural integrity. That’s probably your limiting factor.

Suggest you check what Consumer Reports says about this car’s reliability by system, based on what other owners say. That could give you a clue where best to focus your att’n maintenance-wise to keep it going. For example if it says the fuel system has been problematic, make sure to replace the fuel filter often.


#9

You should not listen (ever again) to the person who told you the engine will last a lot longer because of a replacement transmission. That is utter bunk.

I will also point out that you do NOT have a new transmission. You have a used one which was serviced.

How long the engine and transmission last is dependent more on driving and maintenance habits than anything else.


#10

Junk yard says used trans was serviced? Right.


#11
I am having my transmission replaced on my '09 Pontiac G5 for a reasonable price, with one that has low KM's and has been fully serviced (filters, fluids, etc..) and was just wondering how long I can expect the car to last after this ? How long should the 'engine' of the car theoretically last ?

Sorry to state the obvious but… The car will last exactly as long as you are willing and can afford to repair it.


#12

The car is paid and owned by myself, and I am getting a transmission with around 30,000 km’s on it. I assume its from a car that’s been in an accident and wrote off. its been great to not have a car payment for a while, so unless some pretty huge repairs come along (cars to rusted to drive, engine blows up or something crazy like that) I can certainly afford to fix it, and it will be worth it to fix it until it starts costing me crazy amounts of money. I hope to make it last another year or two realistically with the new transmission


#13

If the engine and transmission are solid right now they should last a long time as long as the engine oil is changed regularly, the oil level is maintained, and the transmission fluid is changed about every 30k miles or so.

The vast majority of engine and transmission failures have damage that is inflicted upon them; as in seldom changing the oil or trans fluid, not checking fluid levels regularly, operating the engine while overheating, ignoring fluid leaks, etc.