Cruise control in the rain


#1

I reviewed past discussions, all closed but happened to be in a major rain event on the interstate, and remembered the warnings about cruise control, so turned it off. We were down to 35mph for a bit, a frog strangler as we say. Just posting this as a reminder.

Got me to thinking about emergency flashers as every one was turning them on, and wondering if on all cars if you step on the bakes, the lights remain solid or continue to flash. Some cars only had yellow lights flashing other cars looked like brake lights flashing.

Hanging out here might have saved me from problems by being aware of something I might have thought of.


#2

@Barkydog

Cruise control should not be used when traction can be compromised by slippery surfaces (water, snow, ice, etcetera). Doing so can cause a wheel to “take-off” accelerating and make things exciting when traction is re-gained moments later. Don’t ask how I know.

“Got me to thinking about emergency flashers as every one was turning them on, and wondering if on all cars if you step on the bakes, the lights remain solid or continue to flash. Some cars only had yellow lights flashing other cars looked like brake lights flashing.”

All the cars I’ve ever had from the advent of emergency flashers will interrupt the flashing when brakes/brake lights activate. I would think any cars that have a design other than that would create a danger worse than not having the hazard lights at all.
CSA


#3

“All the cars I’ve ever had from the advent of emergency flashers will interrupt the flashing when brakes/brake lights activate. I would think any cars that have a design other than that would create a danger worse than not having the hazard lights at all.”

I prefer the approach that Subaru–and some European manufacturers use–i.e. having amber directional lights in the rear that are on a separate circuit from the brake lights. That way, your red brake lights are still operative, even when the directional lights/4-way flashers are activated.


#4

VDCdriver

“I prefer the approach that Subaru–and some European manufacturers use–i.e. having amber directional lights in the rear that are on a separate circuit from the brake lights. That way, your red brake lights are still operative, even when the directional lights/4-way flashers are activated.”

Reminds me of the joke about the blonde who was asked if she smoked after sex.
She replied, “I’m not sure… I’ve never checked.” :wink:

I haven’t really checked my cars recently. I’ll have to turn on the hazards and have somebody hit the brake pedal. I might as well check for smoke, too!

I had a Dodge with amber t-signals. Those amber t-signals are nice until you try to wire trailer lights on a car that does not come with the wiring installed. Been there, done that. :neutral:
CSA


#5

I agree, VDC. I too like that arrangement better.


#6

“Those amber t-signals are nice until you try to wire trailer lights on a car that does not come with the wiring installed.”

Four diodes make it peachy keen.


#7

Please also spread the word to those folks who have daytime running lights; When it rains, TURN ON YOUR LIGHTS because the DRL’s don’t illuminate the tail lights! Its the law in my state and just a great idea for every driver.

And to those drivers with silver, white, gray or other light colored cars, especially turn your lights on. It never fails, when it rains I see one after another light colored cars without any lights while the dark cars have theirs on. (a pet peeve of mine!)


#8

Excellent suggestion, mustangman. I’ve often wondered aloud why manufacturers don’t connect the entire outside lighting system through the ignition cylinder such that whenever the engine is running all the outside lights are illuminated. There could be an override to turn them on without the engine operating as well, or to override the system and turn them temporarily off for times when one is troubleshooting, with a relay that will recycle them to ON at some point.


#9

I don’t like the amber turn signals. I’m OK with separate bulbs and a separate circuit for the turn signals, but amber lights affect the night vision of those behind you. I think they should be outlawed, red only on the rear.


#10

TSM, GM must have seen so many cars roaming around with their DRL’s on at night… with no tail lights, they started putting automatic headlights on most all their cars. You can override the function a turn all the lights or just parking lights on. More companies should maybe do this.


#11

You’ve got my vote!


#12

VDCdriver

“I prefer the approach that Subaru–and some European manufacturers use–i.e. having amber directional lights in the rear that are on a separate circuit from the brake lights. That way, your red brake lights are still operative, even when the directional lights/4-way flashers are activated.”

Agree.

#13

I too agree.


#14

I like the current sentinel lighting system better than the older one. My 1998 Regal had sentinel lighting, but no way to turn the headlights off. Headlights can be irritating if not blinding for security people at checkpoints, and the new system allows the driver to respect the job security has.


#15

“Sentinel lighting”? I’ve never heard that term before. Is that another term for Daytime Running Lights? Or is that the term for the LED strips I keep seeing on the new cars? I like them, and I like the term, I just want to be sure I have its correct usage.


#16

Sentinel lighting is the GM term for lights that turn on automatically at dusk. At least it used to be when I bought my 1998 Regal and 2003 Silhouette.


#17

Got it. Sincere thanks for the info. :smile:


#18

I’ll have to check mine again but I’m pretty sure the lights continue to flash with the brake lights on. In the old days, not so. The only problem with the rear amber lights is that at night you can’t tell if the car is coming or going-front or back. But yeah I got used to not using cruise on any compromised surface when I had RWD and posi traction.