Can A Standard ignition Car get jump started by a car With a Keyless Ignition


#1

can I jump start my normal, like 2001 keyed ignition car (VW Jetta) with another car that has “push to start” keyless ignition?(Honda Civic).


#2

Not sure. .


#3

The heading kind of makes one think that they are going to push the non stating vehicle with another vehicle. Battery jumping will be the same no matter how either vehicle is started. With all the electronics in cars now I would call a service that can jump your vehicle with a portable battery rather than take a chance on frying your electronics or your friends.


#4

Yes, you can jump the car. Usual cautions apply. There is no fundamental difference between a key-turn start and a push button start. In both cases a computer queries a chip in the key to make sure it’s a valid key and then begins the start sequence.


#5

Yup, if you must. I would prefer you use a portable jump box, but jump starting is the same no matter how the car is started.


#6

@JoannaL24
Do not attempt a jump start unless the person doing the hook-up knows exactly what they are doing! This can be both dangerous (as in explosion or burns) and damaging (as in hundreds of dollars or more) to either or both vehicles if done incorrectly!

Seek expert help if needed.
CSA


#7

Assuming u can walk and talk and dress ur self without mommas help, hooking up a battery from car 1 to car 2 is pretty easy. A pushbutton car does have a standard battery.


#8

I’m not aware of any reason it won’t work. There’s always some risk to both cars though, especially newer models with a lot of electronic gadgetry. I even burned out an alternator diode one time on my 20 + year old Corolla jump starting my neighbor’s dead-battery car. My advice if you value your wallet’s contents is to avoid jump starts except in emergencies. It’s safer to remove the battery and charge it with a battery charger overnight.


#9

Gotta agree with George on that. Why try it?


#10

This reminds me of the line used by arrogant clerks in upscale clothing stores; “If you need to ask you can’t afford it.”

If properly connected there should be no problem though.


#11

Get one of those new li-ion devices u plug into the aux power port inside ur car.


#12

With respect, cavell, I cannot agree that anyone that can walk, talk, and dress themselves can or should try to hook up a source battery to a dead battery. A great many very intelligent people that know nothing about cars don’t understand the difference between a series and a parallel circuit, know the proper order and way to connect the cables to prevent a spark, or realize that car batteries can outgas volatile gasses.

Those who lack technical knowledge and skills are much better off IMHO being members of and using an auto club.

As regards Li-ion cell packs, lithium-ion packs have been implicated in fires in a number of applications now, including aircraft and “hover boards”. Heat management in lithium ion matrices is extremely critical, and I for one am not certain that li-ion packs should be riding around plugged into cars’ power ports until they’ve been on the market longer. Commercial versions used by tow trucks have safety systems built into them and the trucks carry fire suppression equipment, but there’s a lot of far less expensive units out there that I’m not certain are safe… and the average driver does not carry a fire extinguisher. I have my doubts.

I would recommend to Joanna that she join an auto club and keep her cell phone charged. It’d be much safer IMHO.


#13

Have we become so overcautious that we are afraid to jump start a car now. It reminds me of the call Tom and Ray got years ago from someones whose neighbor, a recent Russian immigrant jumped the callers car by removing his own battery and inverting it post to post on top of the callers battery.

The caller wanted to know if this was dangerous. Tom and Ray explained that it is relative, if you are under intense machine gun fire while trying to get a car going, the danger from the battery seems insignificant.

Interesting article in today’s paper. Motor vehicle and gun deaths were about the same this year.
Motor vehicle deaths have been falling for years. The surprising part of the article for me was that 2/3 of the gun deaths were suicides.

It is not the terrorists we have to fear, it is our fears.


#14

I still don’t recommend that people who know nothing about cars try to jump start them. I still maintain that it’s much safer to just call AAA. Unless they’re under intense machine gun fire.

Terrorists are a whole different issue, and totally not car related.


#15

Overcautious maybe. But I don’t want to fry my neighbors electronics and I don’t want him to fry mine. The annual auto club fee is much less than a new electric brain for most cars.


#16
I still don't recommend that people who know nothing about cars try to jump start them. I still maintain that it's much safer to just call AAA. Unless they're under intense machine gun fire.
Well, I happen to think it's a sad day for basic human decency when the "preferred" response to a motorist in need of assistance is "Call AAA and leave me alone!" Granted, there are valid safety reasons (not all of which are mechanical!) for this. Still--it was a sad day when people stopped helping out broken-down motorists along the highway, and it'll be a sad day when the same is done for a dead battery, especially in averse weather conditions.

#17

Joe, I never said that.
However, since you’ve brought it up, the old days when you could help someone without setting yourself up for a possible lawsuit are gone forever. Yes, it’s a sad day, but nobody should be criticized for caution.

Besides, what exactly is WRONG with calling AAA? Why is that such a terrible thing?


#18
However, since you've brought it up, the old days when you could help someone without setting yourself up for a possible lawsuit are gone forever. Yes, it's a sad day, but nobody should be criticized for caution.

Gee, “lawsuit” wasn’t where I was going with that–I was thinking that offering/accepting help has a non-zero probability of meeting somebody like Jefferey Dahmer or David Berkowitz. Probably always has.

Besides, what exactly is WRONG with calling AAA? Why is that such a terrible thing?
1. Cost 2. Weather (last time I needed a jump, it was at night, at a ski resort, and 7F.) 3. Time (see above) ~~~and most importantly~~~ 4. The sad forced acknowledgement that, yes, the social fabric has unraveled to the point that it's no longer advisable to be "kind" to strangers.

I once worked at a “mud run” in a park, in Tampa. I got there early, and was unable to get a signal to call my new boss for instructions. When I asked several people to borrow their phone to make a local call, I got a response like I had asked to borrow their passport! When I finally got someone to call FOR me, they explained the problem was a serial killer (or was it rapist?) had been active, in that park, and had used this technique to prevent his victims from calling 911.

That was a sad thing to consider; so is this.


#19

This Discussion Is Drifting (Off Course?).

The Original Question Was,
“can I jump start my normal, like 2001 keyed ignition car (VW Jetta) with another car that has “push to start” keyless ignition?(Honda Civic).”

I thought I gave decent advice when I said, “Do not attempt a jump start unless the person doing the hook-up knows exactly what they are doing! This can be both dangerous (as in explosion or burns) and damaging (as in hundreds of dollars or more) to either or both vehicles if done incorrectly!”

@Rod Knox put it more eloquently when he related, “This reminds me of the line used by arrogant clerks in upscale clothing stores; ‘If you need to ask you can’t afford it’.”
“If properly connected there should be no problem though.”

I stand by my original advice. It’s all too easy to damage modern cars with a well intentioned starting assist, as the many posts here on this topic will attest. Damage is fairly common and an explosion is quite rare, but eyesight is extremely valuable, priceless.

CSA


#20
Well, I happen to think it's a sad day for basic human decency when the "preferred" response to a motorist in need of assistance is "Call AAA and leave me alone!"

I’d say the vast majority of the people in my circle (people I live near, or work, my wife’s family, and probably half my family) know NOTHING about cars. And don’t want to know anything about cars. People set priorities in their life.Knowing how to fix cars isn’t one of them.