Calipers again

toyota
camrysolara

#1

I have an '04 Toyota solar a. In 2012 I replaced the rear calipers and rear break pads and rotors Now 18 months later I have been told that my rear caliper piston is frozen and I have to replace both calipers and beak pad and rotors. Does this sound reasonable. It will cost me another $600. What should I do


#2

I would start with a second opinion by a different mechanic. I don’t know of anything that will cause a caliper to re-fail other than low quality replacement parts.


#3

What were the symptoms?


#4

I’m assuming you are having some kind of symptoms. Caliper pistons can indeed freeze up. Less likely from OEM calipers, but possible even then. If just one caliper has a frozen piston, does the mechanic have an explanation why they want to replace both side’s calipers, pads, rotors? Seems to me the most they would have to replace is pads on both sides, caliper and rotor (maybe) on the bad side.

Assuming the mechanic is correct and new calipers and rotors and pads on both sides are all necessary, $600 seems a reasonable price. Make sure to have all the hydraulic fluid (both front and back) replaced too. Water getting into the brake fluid can cause the pistons to rust and freeze up, so you want to start off with a 100% fresh fill.


#5

I have an 05 4runner and I’m now on my 5th set of calipers. There’s a design flaw with this generation of 4runners. Luckily I bought calipers with a life-time warranty so my last two replacements were FREE. Just my time to replace them.

Caliper pistons can indeed freeze up. Less likely from OEM calipers, but possible even then.

The Toyota 4runner OEM calipers are just as prone to freeze as others. It’s a design flaw. When I buy aftermarket calipers I’m buying USED/REBUILT calipers (as most people do). So I’m using OEM casting and pistons.


#6

Mike

I just googled 4runner frozen calipers, and I got a lot of hits

I did some reading, and apparently it’s a common problem, and Toyota apparently doesn’t want to fess up

It’s amazing that a manufacturer can decide to NOT issue a recall for frozen calipers

If Toyota voluntarily issued a recall, that might be seen as being proactive. It would also send the message that Toyota stands behind its product


#7
I did some reading, and apparently it's a common problem, and Toyota apparently doesn't want to fess up

They fessed up and there was a service bulletin put out (no recall though). When they finally decided to do something about it…if you had less then 60k miles they’d replace the calipers for free. I was already on my 2nd set at the time. They at least fixed the problem in the next generation of 4runners. And the problem doesn’t happen too much in areas that doesn’t see snow. Only seems to be effecting snowy areas.

The calipers aren’t expensive…and are very easy to replace. I now have the lifetime reman calipers…and I haven’t had to buy them again.


#8

Mike

That’s quite pathetic on Toyota’s part

So, essentially, they admitted there was a problem, yet didn’t come out with a solution . . . except to replace the bad part with the same, unchanged bad part, under very specific conditions

Did I get that right?

The fact that you bought lifetime aftermarket calipers, and are able to replace them easily, doesn’t in any way excuse Toyota, in my opinion

And the fact that this problem primarily occurs in States that have snow isn’t very helpful to those living in those states, which are quite numerous

Yet Toyota still has a reputation of building high quality cars . . .

Since me and my family have been driving Toyotas for well over 30 years, we know that their quality has slipped in some cases, and they’re usually pretty good at sweeping things under the rug

Then again, any manufacturer would probably rather sweep something under the rug, if they’re reasonably sure it won’t come back to bite them . . .

Interestingly enough, my Dad was complaining about declining Toyota quality in the 1990s . . . !

He passed away several years ago, and would be quite disappointed with them now. As a matter of fact, at the time that he passed away . . . due to an illness which did him in very quickly . . . he wasn’t considering ever buying another Toyota


#9
That's quite pathetic on Toyota's part

So, essentially, they admitted there was a problem, yet didn’t come out with a solution . . . except to replace the bad part with the same, unchanged bad part, under very specific conditions

I agree Toyota should have done better here. But it’s FAR FAR FAR FAR better then GM’s Intake manifold problem that effected MILLIONS of vehicles for almost 2 decades…or GM’s premature ball-joint failure problem on their mid-size SUV’s that lasted over 16 years before they finally decided to do something about it.

No manufacturer is perfect…but Toyota has done a far better job then most.


#10

Freezing rear caliper calipers are endemic in my area and manufacturers are responding that the answer is caused by the vast amounts of salt dumped on our roads and it is unreasonable for them to have to design cars just for our area.
Dealerships are reccomending annual dissasembling. cleaning, and lubing rear brakes for about $100 at the owners expense.
This problem is by no means limited to Toyota.


#11
This problem is by no means limited to Toyota.

My 4runner now has over 260k miles. And so far the ONLY (and I mean ONLY) repairs have been the calipers…Not counting preventative maintenance like (oil changes, spark-plugs, radiator flush, battery…etc). So…to me the calipers have been extremely MINOR…and the vehicle has been very very reliable. I’m NOT complaining.


#12

Both calipers are bad? Or 1 side? Replace 1 caliper, throw on some new pads. Done.