Battery switch with car running?


#1

Car is 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix, 3.1
Will I damage anything by removing the cars battery while the car is running and installing a dead battery in order to charge it?
If this can safely be done, approximately how long might it take to charge the dead battery?


#2

You could well damage it, large voltage surges could blow out lots of electronics. Not recommended.


#3

Doing so will risk damage to electronics in the car. Not worth the risk in my view.

Why not just take it to an auto parts store to let them charge it?


#4

It is not a good idea to remove a battery from a running car. Current surges can damage electronics. Why risk it?

Use jumper cables to start the other car and let its own charging system handle the dead battery.


#5

Why not simply run jumper cables from the good battery (car) to the dead battery and let it charge for a while. No need to remove the good battery. Unless the “dead” battery is toast, it should take a sufficient charge in about a half hour or less to start an engine.


#6

Thank you for the replies- situation is this;
Against my advice, daughter bought used Saturn Vue Hybrid from a stereotypical used car dealer-over the warranty mileage-car died 200 miles from home, way up in rural area- local repair shop there says the 36 volt battery/system is the problem- can’t afford dealer repair ‘service’, repair- need to get car home- car does not use regular alternator and no charging of batteries with out hybrid system running (36 volt battery) Saturn Mechanic says car will run on the 12 volt battery until it is drained- need fresh battery to continue trip-
So I either need a supply of batteries or a way to recharge the Saturn 12 volt battery during the trip-
Just a side note- the generator for this Hybrid fiasco cost over $500- the 36 volt battery pack cost $800 used, from a salvage yard IF you can find one.
Live and learn.


#7

Look for another way to get the car home, such as towing. Unhooking the battery of a running car is very likely to toast your alternator and perhaps other expensive electrical components. Then you’ve got two cars needing expensive repairs.

Suggest your daughter consider the premium AAA program which allows longer tows for repairs.


#8

Not adviseable to do this. The electronics as well as the alternator could be seriously damaged.


#9

You might consider going to U-haul and renting a tow dolly to bring the vehicle home. If you don’t have a vehicle with a trailer hitch, and cant borrow one, consider renting a small U-haul truck to hook the tow dolly to. BTW, When I say U-haul, I mean it generically, there are other rental companies too.


#10

If you do find that you need a new hybrid battery you should be aware of a GM voluntary recall # 10136;

General Motors has decided to conduct a Voluntary Emission Recall involving certain 2008-2010 model year Chevrolet Malibu and 2007-2009 model year Saturn AURA and VUE hybrid vehicles. The hybrid function on these vehicles may become inoperative. If this occurs, a "Check Engine Light’ will illuminate in the instrument panel and/or a “Service Hybrid” message will illuminate in the Driver Information Center, the engine will run in the gasoline engine mode, and fuel economy would be reduced.

Dealers/retailers are to replace the hybrid batteries and reprogram the engine control module.


#11

Francizek 8:43AM Report
Why not simply run jumper cables from the good battery (car) to the dead battery and let it charge for a while. No need to remove the good battery. Unless the “dead” battery is toast, it should take a sufficient charge in about a half hour or less to start an engine.

That’s what I thought too, but didn’t post it because I expected to get jumped on for something I was overlooking.

kla351: What problem are you trying to solve?