Anything good or bad

Hey everyone, I’m currently looking at buying a Dodge Dakota pick up ranging from 2000-2005. Im leaning towards one with the V8 but am also looking at a couple with the V6 Magnum. Im just curious if anybody has owned or know of any issues they are known for? There seems to be a lot of 04,05’s around the same price people are asking for 1998-1999 models.Thanks for any feedback.

You are looking at 15 to 20 year old vehicles. They don’t all have the same problems. Some could have had the problems taken care of . Why can’t people understand that used vehicles like this need to be inspected by a shop so that might be a chance of not having major repairs right away . As for prices , if the price you are willing to pay matches the sellers price then that is the price for that vehicle.

Check at carcomplaints.com for the years you’re considering. But an inspection is a must.

My extremely limited knowledge of that era Dakota is that the V6 is more suited as a boat anchor.

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I have seen a few of the old 3.7 and 4.7 L engines send a puff of smoke out of the tail pipe when pulling away from a traffic light (leaking valve seals), the 3.9, 5.2 and 5.9 don’t have that problem.

On the other hand the 4.7 L engine comes with the 45RFE transmission, much better than the 42RE or 46RE.

The first generation Dakota is known for PCM failures, aftermaket replacements are available.

A used vehicle inspection will only cover the basics, brakes, tires, suspension, fluid leaks, lights, brief road test etc. The mechanic is not going to discuss the pros and cons of a truck that is being inspected.

1 Like

I’m seeing 6 recalls on the 4.7 L version for 2003, involving airbags, windshield wipers, wiring harness, headlamps, and central timer module (whatever that is). Other problems noted range from the power door locks, erroneous check engine light, automatic transmission problems, steering pulls or wheel is not centered, wheel vibrations. As you might expect on a vehicle of that age the electronic gadgets are likely to become problematic, radio, audio system, power & body modules, etc.

Were I looking at that sort of vehicle I’d try to find one with a manual transmission and as few gadgets and gizmos as possible; i.e. stick to the basic functionality you need, and no more.

I’m a fan of the 5.2/5.9 as opposed to the 4.7. Better truck engine (more torque at low rpm, although giving up or achieving the same hp at high rpm) and generally an old truck engine design with few issues. As far as the trans…it’s a Chrysler, so good luck if it’s an automatic, in my experience. A 5.2 (318) equipped with a 5 speed manual trans would be ideal, but I doubt you’ll find one.

Information, we need information… do you realize that just in the 2000 year line up, there are 26 different models, did you catch that, 26 models? Please see the Chart below…

Edmonds says the price range for the 2000 models range from a low of $300 up to and over $5,500, depending on model and condition.

And if your wallet can stand it, the 2005 ranges from a low of $1,300 to over $13,000.

As you can see there are tooooooo many posssssssibilities to give any meaningful advice to fill your needs. Since you are looking at 20-year old trucks, you will not have the luxury to be fussy. You will have to take what you can find at a price you can afford.

Besides all the possibilities that 26 models present, I have not even gotten into the different engine or transmission options offered in the various models…

Read every posting made to your inquiry and remember they are sharing their experiences and not everyone has the same experiences. My wife '85 Toyota (original owner) is a fantastic car and not everyone who reads this will agree with my assessment of the '85. But in more than 35-years and almost a quarter of a million miles, she (my wife’s car is a “she”) has only failed to get us home once and that was about a year ago when her starter failed, and even then, she got us home by “proxy”, we have towing insurance and the driver brought us home…

So, my once piece of personal advice is if the seller says, “I’m looking to get between $2,000 and $2,500.” You start the negotiation at that bottom price as the highest you’ll pay. But offer less, the seller already stared the negotiation with that range of prices…

Tundra

As with any truck, consider what you intend to do with it. If you’re planning to haul 2 yards of gravel at a time, or pull a 40 foot 5th wheel camper, this would not be a good choice. If you’re hauling fishing poles and bicycles, then it might suit your needs assuming the actual truck is in decent shape.

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You must have been studying Dodge Dakota trucks for a long time for trim level and cab configuration to be a factor in “any issues they are known for”. Why not a general overview?

Yeah, I kind of studied all the choices. I have a 2001 Dodge Ram 2500, diesel, 4x4, and when I start that baby up, the neighbors know… and I have to push it out of the garage or if I start it in the garage, the fumes permeate the whole house. The wife wanted something she could drive and she can’t push it out of the garage so a while back we stopped by our Toyota dealer and our salesman hit her up with all the choices, so that is the only reason I know. PS: I still have my Ram (it’s the short bed, with the suicide doors for the back seat). Sweet!

lol … good story!

thank you,much appreciated.

texases
August 11

Check at carcomplaints.com for the years you’re considering. But an inspection is a must.

Much appreciated,thank you.

Nevada_545
August 11

I have seen a few of the old 3.7 and 4.7 L engines send a puff of smoke out of the tail pipe when pulling away from a traffic light (leaking valve seals), the 3.9, 5.2 and 5.9 don’t have that problem.

On the other hand the 4.7 L engine comes with the 45RFE transmission, much better than the 42RE or 46RE.

The first generation Dakota is known for PCM failures, aftermaket replacements are available.

A used vehicle inspection will only cover the basics, brakes, tires, suspension, fluid leaks, lights, brief road test etc. The mechanic is not going to discuss the pros and cons of a truck that is being inspected.

Thank you,much apprecited

| George_San_Jose1
August 12 |

  • | - |

I’m seeing 6 recalls on the 4.7 L version for 2003, involving airbags, windshield wipers, wiring harness, headlamps, and central timer module (whatever that is). Other problems noted range from the power door locks, erroneous check engine light, automatic transmission problems, steering pulls or wheel is not centered, wheel vibrations. As you might expect on a vehicle of that age the electronic gadgets are likely to become problematic, radio, audio system, etc.

Were I looking at that sort of vehicle I’d try to find one with a manual transmission and as few gadgets and gizmos as possible; i.e. stick to the basic functionality you need, and no more.

Thank you

bjensky_142908
August 12

Information, we need information… do you realize that just in the 2000 year line up, there are 26 different models, did you catch that, 26 models? Please see the Chart below…

Edmonds says the price range for the 2000 models range from a low of $300 up to and over $5,500, depending on model and condition.

And if your wallet can stand it, the 2005 ranges from a low of $1,300 to over $13,000.

As you can see there are tooooooo many posssssssibilities to give any meaningful advice to fill your needs. Since you are looking at 20-year old trucks, you will not have the luxury to be fussy. You will have to take what you can find at a price you can afford.

Besides all the possibilities that 26 models present, I have not even gotten into the different engine or transmission options offered in the various models…

Read every posting made to your inquiry and remember they are sharing their experiences and not everyone has the same experiences. My wife '85 Toyota (original owner) is a fantastic car and not everyone who reads this will agree with my assessment of the '85. But in more than 35-years and almost a quarter of a million miles, she (my wife’s car is a “she”) has only failed to get us home once and that was about a year ago when her starter failed, and even then, she got us home by “proxy”, we have towing insurance and the driver brought us home…

So, my once piece of personal advice is if the seller says, “I’m looking to get between $2,000 and $2,500.” You start the negotiation at that bottom price as the highest you’ll pay. But offer less, the seller already stared the negotiation with that range of prices…