Air conditioning repair jeep


#1

Question about my air conditioning

I checked all fuses and replaced the relay.

Nothing. So then I jump the connection at the condenser to see if the clutch kicks on. I can see it move in or out (I forget but it does not spin. I’m jumping in with a bread tie. So is the clutch junk?


#2

yes, the coil might not be strong enough to pull the clutch hub in, possibly the spacers between the clutch and pulley are worn down or the clutch is worn down. A new clutch assembly (coil, pulley & clutch) will do it.

You could try and take the clutch off (1 bolt) and remove the spacer. Many time this will do the job for a while. Removing the spacer narrows the gap between the clutch and pulley and the coil does not need the same energy to pull the clutch in as it normally needs. It’s a free fix and only takes 30 minutes.

To test this you can use a feeler gauge and measure the air gap between the clutch and pulley. It should be between .020 and .030 and .30 is sort of pushing it, but check for specific parameters for your model and year as they can vary. If you do not have a feeler gauge use 2 business cards. If they do slide between the pulley and clutch the air gap is surely too large.

Edit: By the way, while you have the clutch off try to move the compressor shaft with your hands. If it moves very easy without resistance from the pistons inside, there is a good chance the shaft is broke and you need a new compressor. A broken shaft, obviously, would prevent the clutch from spinning even when engaged.


#3

I thought you were in Alaska anyway? I did have a clutch replaced once but it seemed like it wasn’t too long after that I had to replace the compressor anyway. So I would at least consider just doing the whole compressor with the new clutch as long as you’re at it.


#4

I was in Alaska I’m now in Colorado

I bought freon and found the low pressure side to be at 100 psi. I
released the pressure. (A mistake I’ve since been told)
Because I now need to evacuate the system and recharge or it will all be
junk

Bing
August 8

I thought you were in Alaska anyway? I did have a clutch replaced once
but it seemed like it wasn’t too long after that I had to replace the
compressor anyway. So I would at least consider just doing the whole
compressor with the new clutch as long as you’re at it.


#5

who told you that the system has to be evacuated after you released some refrigerants (there is no more Freon in todays cars).

Seems that you looked at the can pressure and not the low line system pressure, which is around 30-35PSI. There is no need to evacuate the lines unless you released all refrigerant. Just top it off.

Granted, evacuating the system is a good thing to do, but over time the majority of cars will loose some refrigerants and guess what replaces the space…air.

BTW, releasing refrigerants purposely into the air is against the law.


#6

I did recharge the system. But the clutch still does not engage.


#7

well, you wasted your time doing that anyways. We already know there is sufficient refrigerants in the system, otherwise the clutch would not engage. Look at my previous message for resolution. I am absolutely sure that this is your problem, given your description.


#8

The clutch DID NOT engage. It never has


#9

I did recharge the system. But the clutch never did engage

kurtwm2010
August 8

who told you that the system has to be evacuated after you released some
refrigerants (there is no more Freon in todays cars).

Seems that you looked at the can pressure and not the low line system
pressure, which is around 30-35PSI. There is no need to evacuate the lines
unless you released all refrigerant. Just top it off.

Granted, evacuating the system is a good thing to do, but over time the
majority of cars will loose some refrigerants and guess what replaces the
space…air.

BTW, releasing refrigerants purposely into the air is against the law.


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In Reply To
badbearing
August 8
I was in Alaska I’m now in Colorado I bought freon and found the low
pressure side to be at 100 psi. I released the pressure. (A mistake I’ve
since been told) Because I now need to evacuate the system and recharge or
it will all be junk Bing August 8 I thought you were in Alaska anyway? I di…


#10

Ok, not engage, but you said the clutch attempted to move in and out as you were testing it. That is a sign that the clutch is getting the signal to engage and it is trying to do it but does not spin. It would not even do that if the pressure was not sufficient or too high. Regardless how you fool the clutch to engage. If it does not engage, but wants to there has to be one of the problems I described.

Edited: Do me a favor. Turn on the engine and the a/c. If the clutch does not spin give it a quick push, right in the middle, with a long screwdriver or some other long tool or piece of wood. Just be careful of turning belts. Let us know what happens, if anything.


#11

It does nothing


#12

If you showed a 100 PSI on the low side with the A/C or engine off then that’s pretty close to normal. You should not be bleeding anything off because that 100 is the system static pressure.

The normal static pressure on most cars is about 120 ish or so. A 100 would mean a slight undercharge.


#13

and that is exactly what my 1997 Acura CL did a few weeks ago. The clutch would try to engage but never made contact with the pulley. In my case it would make contact if I gave it a little push. I replaced the clutch, pulley and coil and all worked well thereafter. This is what my clutch assembly looked like. Bottom old, top new. I still believe you are having the same problem, except a touch worse.