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97 Honda CRV

I have a 97 Honda CRV with 177 thousand miles. It was in a major accident and has front end damage as well as the air bags went off. It still starts and looks like the engine is fine. I bought it new and have been very good about maintenance. It is in great condition. My insurance said it was a total and offered $6000. If I keep it they will give me $4,300. My neighbor is a mechanic and said he could fix it for $4,000. Do I keep it and fix it or take the money and give my car to the insurance company? I have no idea what to do. Please help me!!!

Take the $6000 and get a different car. Your rebuilt CRV might turn out ok cosmetically, but it may not be as safe in a future accident. An 11 year old car with 177k miles isn’t worth saving in the face of a $6000 pay out. Besides, you can get great deals on cars right now, new or used.

What I question is the ability to make this car “good” again for only $4000.00.If you could give us a better break down I would feel better,those pricey air bags bother me,along with the SRS module,what is your mechanics speciality? what type of facility does he have? will this be a pro job with warranty?

It is not a pro job with a warranty. It is a small auto body shop. I don’t really know much about him or the company he works for. I am worried about the air bags as well. I also have a new baby and would hate to put him in an unsafe vehicle.

I think that a $6000 offer on a 12 year old car w/ 177K is a crazy good offer. I would take the money and run. This car will never be the same and it won’t have a very good resale value. The car market, new and used, is glutted and most everyone is desperate for buyers. I think having it fixed would be nuts especially if “It is not a pro job with a warranty”

Thank you! I appreciate your advice. It really helped make my decision easier.

Point #5: The definition of fixed is variable. It will be fixed buy you might not like the vehicle afterward. It’s never worth the money to get the thing back on the road at 177,000 miles.