80+ yr old IDIOT


#1

So, I’m driving to the store this afternoon & this IDIOT (80+) gets over in the turning lane about 2500 to soon, I speed up a little to get over myself, while stopped at the light I look up & realize he shut is engine off? He stops behind me at the next light & does the same? My question is… does he really think this is worth it? I could be wrong, as I have many times, but this just seemed crazy to me! What do you think?


#2

Unless there is an unusually long waiting time at that traffic light, it is not a good idea to shut one’s engine off in that type of situation–especially since it will probably take longer for that driver to get his car into gear once the light changes, thus inconveniencing other drivers.

IMHO, it is not a good idea to call someone else an idiot until you can produce a few sentences without at least six mistakes.
;-))


#3

VDCdriver is there a guide for all those blog(thread)symbols all you regulars use? what does 11RC mean? I recently retired from the garage (disc problems). Never had the time to explore a forum before (AllData doesnt count) ;-)) dont know what it means (hope its not bad)


#4

IIRC=If I recall correctly.

IMHO=In my humble opinion.

LOL=Laughing out loud.

ROFLOL=Rolling on floor, laughing out loud.

I’m sure that there are lots of others, but these are the most commonly used internet abbreviations or acronyms. Other forum members can probably give us a much longer list than I can.


#5

Here’s a few more:

http://www.gaarde.org/acronyms/


#6

What you describe is common practice, at least from what I’ve been told, in Europe.

I think the guy is not an idiot (I wouldn’t be so quick to ascribe this term to someone else, considering your post), but a person trying to save some gas (and/or money) and not caring what others think about what he’s doing.

He’s not saving much, I’ll admit, but he’s saving a little bit of fuel each time, and as they say, “A billion here and a billion there and sooner or later you’re talking real money.”

I applaud this old codger for doing his bit to save fuel. I’ve been considering doing the same thing myself.

What I want to know is; why does this gentleman’s behavior bother you so much?

You don’t indicate that he impeded your progress, or got in your way, and yet you call him an idiot.

For shutting off the engine in his vehicle?

It’s his vehicle. He can do whatever he wants (within reason) with it. Why does this annoy you?

If things keep going the way they have been lately, we’ll ALL be doing this soon! Then perhaps you will be the only non-idiot on the highway.

Best of luck.


#7

He CAN’T be an idiot. He’s over 80 years old and has never killed himself in an automobile accident, yet!


#8

How dare you call me an idiot! My car was having mild overheating problems – the cooling fan was not coming on. Temperature remained normal as long as the car was moving but the gauge would creep up to dangerous levels when idling. If I shut off the engine each time I stopped, all was well, and I made it home successfully. It was just a blown fuse.

Would you, 8&sand, have had the wits to handle such an emergency? I doubt it, judging from your assessment of the situation and your inability to write without errors.


#9

Sometimes people assume that because they don’t understand another’s motives, that other person must be stupid. I think tht those who assume such things are at least misguided and may be too full of themselves.


#10

When you are turning the engine off, you are also turning off the water pump. The engine will keep getting warmer for a bit after you turn off the engine. (because no coolant is circulating). Before it cools down due to the ambient temperature difference. So if you’re turning off the engine whilst stopped in the above scenario you are just making things worse.


#11

" When you are turning the engine off, you are also turning off the water pump. The engine will keep getting warmer for a bit after you turn off the engine. (because no coolant is circulating). Before it cools down due to the ambient temperature difference. So if you’re turning off the engine whilst stopped in the above scenario you are just making things worse. "

Well, that’s obviously not true.

From where would the heat come if the engine continued to get warmer after being shut down? With no source of additional heat the engine could not get hotter. It is, in fact, true that the COOLANT would get hotter with the engine shut down since the coolant would have more time to absorb heat while sitting still in the engine. This means only that the engine is getting cooler, though, since the heat is transfering to the coolant. The overall effect of shutting down the engine would be to create less heat since no fuel is being burned, and since it would still be radiating heat from every hot surface, the net result would be cooling of the engine.


#12

The gentleman is probably not an idiot; just misguided and basing his actions on what someone told him or what he may have read.


#13

What do you think causes vapor lock on carbureted cars? The engine does get hotter momentarily after shut-off.


#14

“What do you think causes vapor lock on carbureted cars? The engine does get hotter momentarily after shut-off.”

Nope, sorry. I cannot agree until you tell me the source of the additional heat after the engine is shut off.

As for what I think causes vapor lock, it’s the engine getting COOLER that causes it. The heat is transfered from the engine (making it cooler) to the FUEL (making it hotter). The hot fuel boils. But the engine did NOT get any hotter.


#15

No it doesn’t. Total heat in the engine does not increase, but the hottest spots in the engine will transfer heat to the cooler parts through conduction, convection and radiation. Heat conducts from hot to cold, from the combustion chamber to the coolant passages. Heat radiates uniformly from the outside of the engine in all directions, but convection currents in the cooling system will cause the hotter coolant to rise to the top making the top of the engine get a little hotter.

It only seems like the engine is getting hotter because the area around the temperature sending units is getting hotter as they are usually located at the top of the cooling system. Of course in those old carburated engines, especially the V8’s, the carburetor took the brunt of all the excess heat radiating from the top of the engine.


#16

Geezuz. A few? Aren’t those what people use for text messaging?


#17

OK, I was going to ask the poster if he/she knew that’s the way some Hybrid vehicles run in the city, until I realized he/she may not understand that concept either.


#18

Some of those acronyms started LONG BEFORE the internet or even Cell phones. When someone sitting at a terminal on a Mainframe computer wanted to communicate with someone else on another terminal on the same mainframe…we could send messages. I’ve been using acronyms computer communication for over 30 years. It’s just got a lot more elaborate and mainstream.


#19

If you have an electric stovetop do this; put your hand on a burner/element, next put turn the burner on full for about 3 to 5 seconds. Then turn it off. You will find that even though you turned the power off quickly. The element will continue to get hot for another minute or so even if though you only had the power on briefly. This is the same principle that causes an engine to actually get hotter right after you turn the engine off.


#20

Now your timewarping…it’s TTY shorthand, originated with Telex operators and got carried over to mainframe computing by the same technical pool.

TTY shorthand is still everywhere and is even used for data control characters (ack - acknowledged, nack - guess… and eot End Of Text). Even textual (non graphical) computer monitors have their embedded history, they are 80 characters wide, as are the original narrow carriage dot matrix printers.

80 characters = 1 punch card, or 1 record. The industry never saw a need to change it.